The annoying threat

NGOs’ role as fifth estate under sharp focus

yogesh

Yogesh Rajput | January 30, 2015



The high-handedness of the government, often coming to light when it restricts movement, speech or action of the common man as suited by subjectivity, now finds a serious challenge in holding a firm ground. The spoilsport for the government has off late been the judiciary, which has (much to the public’s delight) involuntarily been performing the role of a big brother.
 
The Delhi high court while hearing the plea of Priya Pillai, a human rights activist, issued notices to various government bodies asking them to explain the grounds on which she was recently offloaded from a London-bound flight at Delhi airport. Pillai, a campaigner with Greenpeace, was scheduled to visit the UK to make a presentation before British MPs on alleged human rights violation in Mahan, Madhya Pradesh.
 
The government’s act, which would have well surprised the activist, should however not be considered as coming out of the blue as its instigations had been forming a concrete shape for quite some time. In the much-talked about report of the Intelligence Bureau that came out last year accusing several foreign-funded NGOs (including Greenpeace) of stalling important government projects and “threatening national economic security”, the centre in bold letters had expressed its discomfort with the consistent ‘screech in the ear’ criticism thrown towards it from the NGOs - a collective which with its loud voice, quietly works to form the unnoticed fifth estate.
 
Unlike journalists, NGOs have never been much feared by the government, not much attention has been given to what opinion they make of the government and its activities. It has only been in the recent past that the government now sees these pressure groups as a potential threat in exposing its shortcomings …ummm… national economic security.     
 
The central government is already pushing to attain greater influence for ruling in matters of freedom of expression after it recently supported the validity of Section 66-A of the IT Act in front of the supreme court (the section has been criticised by many of being unconstitutional and violating one’s freedom of speech). Under such circumstances, the judiciary is all the more expected and required to draw a more legible line separating expressions that pose threat to national security and those in national interest.   

 

Comments

 

Other News

BHEL commissions supercritical thermal power plant in UP

With the commissioning of the third unit of the Prayagraj Super Thermal Power Project (PSTPP), Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL) has successfully executed the 1,980 MW coal-based supercritical thermal power project in Uttar Pradesh.   The first two units of the project

A corporation to be set up for Digital India

The ministry of electronics and information technology (MEITY) will set up a new body, Digital India Corporation (DIC), to execute prime minister’s ambitious Digital India programme. The corporation will subsume some of the existing agencies within the ministry including the National e-Gove

India, Japan to build Asia-Africa corridor to checkmate OBOR

While India and China are pitted against each other in South Asia and the Southeast Asian region, and the former’s refusal to participate in Beijing held summit on One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative was a low point in their bilateral ties, New Delhi is now preparing an initiative that will r

Pragati Maidan to be turned into exhibition-cum-convention centre

The existing Pragati Maidan complex is set to get a new face with its redevelopment into a world class state-of-the-art integrated exhibition-cum-convention centre (IECC).   CMD, India Trade Promotion Organisation (ITPO), L C Goyal and CMD, NBCC (India) Limited, Anoop Kumar M

GAIL clocks 57% rise in profit after tax in 2016-17 FY

GAIL (India) Limited has registered 57 percent rise in profit after tax (PAT) for the 2016-17 fiscal with the PAT increasing to Rs 3,503 crore from Rs 2,226 crore in the last fiscal.   The rise in profit was boosted mainly by a turnaround in the company’s petrochemical

The case of former coal secy and the anti-corruption law

  A senior bureaucrat, apparently much respected among the administrative circles, faces two years in jail. His crime: a decision that may have come from the political leadership.   HC Gupta, a former coal secretary, is among the three bureaucrats convicted b



Video

प्रभुनाथ सिंह को हत्याकांड में उम्रकैद की सजा

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter