In conversation with Musician Salil Bhatt

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Sweta Ranjan | May 27, 2016


#Musician   #Musician Salil Bhatt  


Salil Bhatt is an Indian classical musician born in a family that has a 500-year-old legacy in music. He represents the tenth generation of famous Bhatt lineage and is the son of renowned Mohan Veena player, Grammy awardee Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt. Like his father who created Mohan Veena, Salil has created the Satvik Veena for which received several accolades. He is the first Indian to perform in the parliament of Germany. He has also received a pre-Grammy nomination along with Maharana Mewar foundation award, Abhinav Kala Samman, Mahakal Sangeet Ratan and International Achievers Awards among others.

Happiness to me: It would mean the dong music which is the best and most beautiful thing God has gifted in my life. When I perform for two hours, audience enjoy and applaud me, that is happiness to me. I would prefer music over millions of bucks.

If I had no music in my life: Probably I would have been a brigadier by now because I qualified for the Indian Military Academy but did not join.

Person I admire the most: It would be injustice if I mention just one person but I admire my guru, my father Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt, the most.

Mohan Veena to me: It is my first love. Mohan Veena is the very first instrument I touched and was introduced to music through it.

My most prized possession:
Right now my most prized possession is Satvik Veena. I am with it all the time. My kids Satvik and Satkriti are also the reasons of my existence.

Being the son of a Grammy award winner: People feel that my life must be like a bed of roses but it is exactly opposite. The most difficult thing is being a celebrity son or daughter.

My advice to young musicians:
They should not refrain from hard work. They must know to differentiate between learning classical music from a reality show that gives them instant fame. There is a lot to learn in classical music and one should not be in a hurry to come on stage.

My weakness: Good food.

My favourite piece of music: ‘A meeting by the river’ from my father’s Grammy award winning album.

High point in my life: Performing in the parliament of Germany and Reykjavik, Iceland and being the first Indian musician ever to do that. I played for APJ Abdul Kalam.

Low point in my life: January 5, 2015, when I suddenly collapsed and went lifeless for a few moments.

Who is the best at Mohan Veena – your dad, you or your son? That would be Satvik, my son. If he practises more, I won’t be able to stand in front of him. He is a born genius.

I want to be remembered as: A musician, who made his audience crazy with Indian music as I want the world to realise the greatness of our country.

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