SC collegium stands firm on Manjunath's elevation

Turns down centre's suggestion to reconsider the move

deevakar

Deevakar Anand | July 16, 2014



The supreme court (SC) collegium – a panel consisting of senior judges – has put its foot down for appointment of Karnataka high court (HC)  judge KL Manjunath as chief justice of Punjab and Haryana HC, turning down the government’s suggestion to reconsider it.

This comes close on the heels of a face-off between the judiciary and the government over former solicitor general Gopal Subramanium’s candidature for elevation as an SC judge.

The law ministry had sent back justice Manjunath’s recommendation to the collegium after a senior judge wrote adverse note, questioning his elevation.

Though the details of the comments have not been known yet, media reports say the law ministry consulted prime minister Narendra Modi in this matter.

On Tuesday, the collegium, however, did not find any merit in the apprehensions raised by the government and reiterated its recommendation to make him the chief justice of Punjab and Haryana HC.

Going by the rules, the centre is left with no other option but to approve his elevation.

In June, the Modi government had sent back the name of Gopal Subramanium for elevation as an SC judge. Subramanium then withdrew his consent to be a judge and accused the government of “serious constitution aberration” and “orchestrated drama”.

On July 7, chief justice of India (CJI) RM Lodha, at a farewell function for a fellow judge, called the government’s objection to Subramnium’s elevation as judge a unilateral decision on which he was not consulted. In a letter to the law ministry, he made clear his displeasure on the issue asking the government not to indulge in such unilateral acts in future without taking his consent.

Comments

 

Other News

No central government scheme to run endlessly

 Centrally sponsored schemes will now onwards run for a fixed period of time, thanks to a sunset date. An outcome review will also be carried out.   In public policy, a sunset clause means that it shall cease to have effect after a specific date, unless further legislative/a

What India needs to do to finally become a superpower

For the past 25 years, India has been rising in stature. It is continually called an upcoming superpower but has been unable to reach the promised status. India’s importance in the world is more due to its immense population and potential as a market than any objective assessment of development. Indi

Would keeping an army tank at JNU instil nationalism?

Would keeping an army tank at JNU instil nationalism?

Yogi in politics, TN industries shift base and, how to end the Maharaja’s misery

Everyone in Yogi Adityanath`s office declares that Yogi’s political career is founded on the work carried out from there, first when he was mahant of the influential temple, and then as an MP. Vijendra Singh, who works at the office, says “It’s because of these letters that Yogiji has n

A fifth of Rs 29 lakh crore are NPAs

Banks have advanced a staggering Rs 29,46,060 crore to the industrial sector, of which Rs 6.93 lakh crore are non-performing assets (NPAs).   Finance minister Arun Jaitley informed

Demonetisation not meant to change cash use by people: Harvard economist

 Here are 10 things that Kenneth Rogoff, Thomas D Cabot professor of public policy, department of economics, Harvard University, and author of `The Curse of Cash`, said about demonetisation at the Delhi Economics Conclave 2017: 1. The core idea for demone





Video

कश्मीर पर तीसरे पक्ष की मध्यस्थता स्वीकार नहीं - महबूबा

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter