Living in a world of parallels

ankitalahiri

Ankita Lahiri | June 18, 2015


#myntra   #lesbian couples   #lesbian couple india   #lesbian couple add  

“Bold is beautiful”

Are Indians finally opening up their mindsets? Few days ago, the Indian advertising world took a step and launched the country’s first advertisement depicting a lesbian couple.

In the current age of hypocrisy, Myntra has taken a stand to give a voice to that section of the society which has been declared as criminals for a choice that they have made- a choice of partnership and a choice of love.

The way homosexuality has been treated in Indian society has always been disturbing. Termed as “unnatural,” the idea of a same sex relationship in Indian society has always been considered a taboo. For the Indian society a relationship has always had one ultimate goal, to increase the family. Somehow the whole idea of freedom to choose has always bypassed the discussions on this topic.

At times when countries like Britain are welcoming the idea of same sex marriage, India is still struggling with the fact that homosexuality is a crime. On one hand we still obsessively stick to the British constitution, but in this case we beg to differ? Why such double standards?
 
In December 2013, the supreme court reversed the Delhi high court decision and declared homosexuality as an offence.

It is in this scenario that two remarkable events have occurred recently. Not only did the advertising world celebrate an “out of the closet” relationship, but a mother also put up a matrimonial advertisement, seeking a groom for her son. Both events have caused controversial waves throughout the nation.

When the judiciary system in the country continues to view homosexuality as an act that harms the society, how can the society itself promote the subject? Are we living in parallel worlds or is the law being too naive to the changing tides of perception?
 
Even if for a moment we say it is only the advertising agency and the brand itself that is promoting the nontraditional relationship, it will be fair to say that both the promoters and the ones who declare it as a crime are made of people of the same society. Then why does this level of hypocrisy still exist within the same class?

The two events have led to the birth of a question- are we free to choose who we love?
 
Instead of being scared of these “different” events, can we possibly view them as expressions of love? Maybe even an act of courage, an attempt to give voice to the people who choose to love in their own way. Has the time not come to celebrate the freedom of falling in love, exclusive of the gender, instead of being termed as outcasts?

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