Population, corruption are main hindrances to the development: NHRC chairperson

A deep-seated organised political or systematic corruption can paralyse a nation, says HL Dattu

GN Bureau | August 19, 2016


#corruption   #human rights   #NHRC   #HL Dattu   #population   #development  
HL Dattu, chairperson, NHRC
HL Dattu, chairperson, NHRC

Growing population and corruption are the two main hindrances in the way of good governance towards the development of India, said justice HL Dattu, chairperson, National Human Rights Commission (NHRC). Citing examples of the Right to Information Act and the Digital India campaign, he said that there has been some progress in bringing transparency in governance and fighting the simpler forms of corruption but deep-seated organised political or systematic corruption can paralyse a nation.

 
While inaugurating a two-day national seminar on ‘Good governance, development and human rights’, organised by the commission in collaboration with the National Law University at its campus in New Delhi, justice Dattu said that the best way to combat corruption is that the governments must strive to rid themselves of corruption and bribery. They should become accountable and transparent in order to preserve the integrity of democracy.
 
The NHRC chairperson said that corruption typically diverts funding from state budgets which should be dedicated to the full realisation of all human rights. We need to promote more researches for finding tenable solutions to end the menace of corruption. He said that without achieving certain optimum standards of efficiency, it would be difficult for the country to reach the 17 new sustainable developments goals set by the United Nations for overall improvements of society. 
 
He said that the NHRC is committed to good governance towards the protection and promotion of human rights of all. A country cannot be considered having good governance, if the people of that country are corrupt and the population grows rapidly. Corruption destroys economic foundations, impedes the ability of developing countries to attract foreign investment.  It also hinders the growth of democratic institutions affecting human rights.
 
Prof Ranbir Singh, vice chancellor, National Law University, said that with more and more people with criminal background getting elected to parliament, how could anyone expect that human rights will be protected. Citing several instances, he highlighted that right to equality, dignity, life and liberty in the country still appear to be a distant dream for many.
 
Prof GS Bajpai, registrar, National Law University, said that strengthening of institutional mechanism will be necessary to ensure sustainable development. 
 
Dr Ranjit Singh, joint secretary, NHRC, said that the good governance is a feel good factor. Giving a historical perspective to the evolution of human rights and good governance, he said that the country can reap the benefits of its demographic dividend only by ensuring good governance leading to realisation of human rights for all.
 
The seminar, divided into various academic and thematic sessions, will be addressed by several prominent speakers to identify the areas of concerns impeding good governance and realisation of human rights for all.
 

Comments

 

Other News

New study tracks heat wave; exposes dangerous trends in big cities

An unprecedented heat wave has been enveloping Indian cities, worsening the urban heat island effect, this summer. A new analysis by Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) says there are far deeper and longer term evidences on the nature of this changing trend that is impacting the biggest cities of the

Phase 6: Voter turnout 59.06% at 7:45 PM

Polling in the sixth phase of General Elections 2024 which commenced across 58 PCs recorded an approximate voter turnout of 59.06% as of 7:45 pm Saturday. In spite of hot weather in certain parts of the country, voters were undeterred in their enthusiasm as they were seen queuing up patient

Banks not adhering to RBI guidelines, finds study

Banks across India are levying inconsistent service charges on basic savings accounts. A study, “Benchmarking Reasonableness of Service Charges by Banks in India”, uncovers and exposes inconsistencies in adherence to RBI mandates by banks. It finds some banks impose charges exceeding reasonable

“Mumbai Infra boom similar to that of Manhattan in 19th C”

Mumbai’s ongoing infrastructure boom – with a new coastal road, Atal Setu, metro lines and much more – creating transport corridors – is comparable to that of Manhattan in New York during 1811-1870, according to BMC commissioner Bhushan Gagrani. The iconic projects being implemented

Global Gandhi: How the Mahatma captured the world’s imagination

Gandhi’s Australia, Australia’s Gandhi By Thomas Weber Orient BlackSwan, 348 pages, Rs 1,800  

Urban apathy in Mumbai, Maharashtra sees 49% voting

Polling in the fifth phase of General Elections 2024 which commenced at 7 am on Monday simultaneously across 49 PCs recorded an approximate voter turnout of 57.47% as of 7:45 pm. Voters came out in large numbers braving hot weather in many parts of the states that went for polls on Monday.

Visionary Talk: Amitabh Gupta, Pune Police Commissioner with Kailashnath Adhikari, MD, Governance Now


Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook Twitter Google Plus Linkedin Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter