Population, corruption are main hindrances to the development: NHRC chairperson

A deep-seated organised political or systematic corruption can paralyse a nation, says HL Dattu

GN Bureau | August 19, 2016


#corruption   #human rights   #NHRC   #HL Dattu   #population   #development  
HL Dattu, chairperson, NHRC
HL Dattu, chairperson, NHRC

Growing population and corruption are the two main hindrances in the way of good governance towards the development of India, said justice HL Dattu, chairperson, National Human Rights Commission (NHRC). Citing examples of the Right to Information Act and the Digital India campaign, he said that there has been some progress in bringing transparency in governance and fighting the simpler forms of corruption but deep-seated organised political or systematic corruption can paralyse a nation.

 
While inaugurating a two-day national seminar on ‘Good governance, development and human rights’, organised by the commission in collaboration with the National Law University at its campus in New Delhi, justice Dattu said that the best way to combat corruption is that the governments must strive to rid themselves of corruption and bribery. They should become accountable and transparent in order to preserve the integrity of democracy.
 
The NHRC chairperson said that corruption typically diverts funding from state budgets which should be dedicated to the full realisation of all human rights. We need to promote more researches for finding tenable solutions to end the menace of corruption. He said that without achieving certain optimum standards of efficiency, it would be difficult for the country to reach the 17 new sustainable developments goals set by the United Nations for overall improvements of society. 
 
He said that the NHRC is committed to good governance towards the protection and promotion of human rights of all. A country cannot be considered having good governance, if the people of that country are corrupt and the population grows rapidly. Corruption destroys economic foundations, impedes the ability of developing countries to attract foreign investment.  It also hinders the growth of democratic institutions affecting human rights.
 
Prof Ranbir Singh, vice chancellor, National Law University, said that with more and more people with criminal background getting elected to parliament, how could anyone expect that human rights will be protected. Citing several instances, he highlighted that right to equality, dignity, life and liberty in the country still appear to be a distant dream for many.
 
Prof GS Bajpai, registrar, National Law University, said that strengthening of institutional mechanism will be necessary to ensure sustainable development. 
 
Dr Ranjit Singh, joint secretary, NHRC, said that the good governance is a feel good factor. Giving a historical perspective to the evolution of human rights and good governance, he said that the country can reap the benefits of its demographic dividend only by ensuring good governance leading to realisation of human rights for all.
 
The seminar, divided into various academic and thematic sessions, will be addressed by several prominent speakers to identify the areas of concerns impeding good governance and realisation of human rights for all.
 

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