Unique case of Arvind's anarchy: more things change...

He is the first self-styled anarchist who is trying to enforce an order through the tool of governance

ajay

Ajay Singh | January 22, 2014



Anarchy is order, whereas government is civil war. Such a differentiation between anarchy and government as illustrated in the Anarchist Manifesto in 1850 appears more real than an academic formulation in today’s India. With Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal proclaiming himself to be an anarchist, the transition from order to disorder is quite palpable.

Kejriwal is neither the first chief minister to raise a banner of revolt against an autocratic centre nor would he be the last. He conformed to the pattern of chief ministers who took on the centre in their own way – since the unconstitutional sacking of the communist regime in Kerala in 1959. Of late the chief ministers of Gujarat, West Bengal, Odisha and Bihar have been known for using every forum to run down the union government.

But Kejriwal is still an exception for many reasons. He is the first self-styled anarchist who is trying to enforce an order through the tool of governance. This contradicts the ideal state of anarchy as prescribed in the Manifesto. But what is more significant is the fact that unlike his garrulous counterparts from others states, Kejriwal does not qualify to be a conventional political adversary subscribing to traditional logic and idioms.

His formulations are unusual and strategies quite subversive. His decision to lay siege to North and South Blocks, the ultimate seat of India’s political power, was just an indication of his strong belief in himself and his self-righteous approach to politics. At times he appears be a statist who promotes his political agenda in the garb of public opinion. In the midst of this growing contradiction what is particularly interesting is the fact that Kejriwal sees his politics as a precursor to change. But given the way he is acquiring the trappings of power, it seems that more things change more they remain the same.

 

Comments

 

Other News

Ransomware 2.0 hits India, Europe

Barely a month after the global Wannacry cyber hack, a new variant of ransomware malware has locked systems across several European countries and India. Petya, as cyber researchers call it, uses vulnerability in the Microsoft’s Windows system, and encrypts the computer files. It is understo

Threat still there to Niyamgiri: Green Nobel winner Prafulla Samantra

Prafulla Samantra, a social activist from Odisha has bagged the Goldman Environmental Prize, described as the Green Nobel Prize, for his long struggle to save the Niyamgiri hills from bauxite mining. He received the award in San Francisco in April 2017. He had fought the Niyamgiri issue right up to the Sup

What kind of ally should India consider the US?

What kind of ally should India consider the US?

US action on Hizb chief dampens Kashmiri separatists’ spirits

The USA declaring Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin as a specially designated global terrorist may not take the sting out of terrorists’ plans in Kashmir immediately but it has given a huge setback to Kashmiri separatists who had always hoped for American intervention in the Indo-Pak standoff o

Music is universal. It has no language: Vani Jairam

Vani Jairam’s childhood dream of becoming a playback singer was realised when veteran film music composer Vasant Desai gave her the opportunity to sing Bole Re Papi Hara and two other songs in the movie Guddi. After that, the multilingual singer went on to sing for eminent music per

Should there be death penalty for those involved in lynching?

Should there be death penalty for those involved in lynching?





Video

‘सामना’ ने की मोदी की तारीफ

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter