In conversation with writer Pratibha Ray

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Puja Bhattacharjee | November 18, 2015




Pratibha Ray is an eminent Odia writer and has penned several novels, short stories and travelogues. Born in a remote village of Odisha, Pratibha believes that life and love are synonymous. As a child, she was friends with children from marginalised communities. It was their pain and sufferings that prompted her to write. She has been actively involved in social reforms and has raised voice against social injustice. Her first book Barsha Basanta Baishakha, written in 1974, was a best-seller. Her novel Aparichita was adapted into a film that won the best film story award from the state government. 



Writing to me is: Writing emerges out of love and fearlessness. When you love something you become fearless. Writing is a voice for the voiceless. I write because I breathe.

Had I not been a writer I would have been: I would have been a storyteller nonetheless. Storytelling began with spoken words and evolved into writing.

My favourite pastime: Travelling, gardening, reading and spending time with my grandchildren.

My most memorable moment: There are many big and small memorable moments. I believe that memorable moments are made of both good and bad events.

My biggest challenge so far: Writing my autobiography.

I am attracted to: Dissidents and downtrodden rather than aristocrats in ivory towers.

The book I am reading now: An End to Suffering by Pankaj Mishra.

First thing I do in the morning: Household work.

My advice to aspiring writers: Nurture your inner instincts and take the obstacles as challenges.

Right now I am busy with: Working on a novel.

My biggest fear: I cannot sleep in the dark.

My biggest strength: Boldness, taking on challenges.

My biggest weakness: I trust people easily. My children call it my weakness but I do not agree with them.

My favourite writer: Gopinath Mohanty, Leo Tolstoy and Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

My most cherished memory: Birth of my grandchildren.

The person I admire the most: My father.

The person I despise the most: No one. Being a writer you cannot reject anyone. There is no place for hatred, only love.

My biggest inspiration: I believe in inspiration emerging from within.

I want to be remembered as: I have never thought about it.

Spirituality to me is:
Humanity. Spirituality cannot exist without humanity.
 

 

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