NMC bill is the first step in larger reforms in health sector: NITI Aayog advisor

Alok Kumar, a 1993 batch IAS officer of UP cadre, joined NITI Aayog as advisor in July 2015. He talks about the proposed National Medical Commission (NMC) bill.

pankaj

Pankaj Kumar | October 15, 2016 | New Delhi


#medical council of India   #MCI   #NMC   #national medical commission   #NITI Aayog  
Alok Kumar, advisor, NITI Aayog
Alok Kumar, advisor, NITI Aayog

Is the way MCI being run the only problem or the issue is about its rules, regulations and mandate? 
It was both. There were structural problems in MCI’s composition in that there was an inherent conflict of interest when the regulators were elected from amongst those who they were supposed to regulate. It became an exclusive domain of the doctors though health as a subject is of vital concern to citizens and in other countries doctors as well as non-doctors jointly regulate the profession. 
 
As far as the rules and regulations formulated by the MCI, they have been largely focused on regulating the inputs rather than outcome. There is a lack of transparency in the processes followed by the MCI and that is why it comes across as an opaque organisation which lacks the professionalism required to regulate such an important profession which affects all the citizens.
 
How will replacing MCI with NMC improve medical education in India?
By institutionalising an outcome-based regulation approach under the proposed NMC, the focus of the regulator will shift from inputs to quality of medical personnel being produced by the medical institutions. This shift in focus would enable the institutions to focus on quality of teaching and improving the knowledge and skills imparted to their students rather than worrying about the inspector raj. By ensuring proactive disclosure on part of the medical institutions in the form of rating of colleges, the NMC will facilitate the prospective students of making an informed choice, while selecting their institutions of study.
 
 
 
Is MCI alone responsible for the downfall in medical education?
It would be unrealistic to blame MCI alone for the current state of disrepair in the medical education as the parliamentary standing committee points out in its report. But it will also be delusional not to apportion a fair share of responsibility upon MCI in view of the processes, institutional mechanisms and the approach to regulation adopted by them.
 
How does the bill address the concerns regarding fee regulation?
Regulation of fee needs to balance to countervailing public policy objectives: one objective is to keep fees attractive enough to ensure that private capital investment is attracted to this sector to address the huge shortage in medical personnel and the other is to keep the fees low enough so that no meritorious student is denied an opportunity of pursuing medical studies because she/he cannot afford the fees and also that after passing out they do not need to gouge their patients to recover the investment made in their education. Both are valid concerns and that is why a 40:60 ratio of subsidised seats to fully paid seats was considered as an acceptable compromise. 
 
Many experts call it a big-bang reform. How do you see it? 
We see it as a first essential step in the much larger endeavour of reforming the health sector in India. I am personally wary of using such adjectives as “big-bang” because reform is a continuous process.
 
How will you ensure the new body doesn’t indulge in corruption?
Corruption is defined by this famous formula: Corruption = Monopoly + Discretion – Accountability. In the proposed NMC bill we have tried to reduce monopoly by farming off separate functions to independent boards; to reduce discretion by moving to a well established and a non-discretionary outcome-based regulation from an opaque, non-transparent and discretionary input based regulatory approach. We have also sought enhanced accountability by a well institutionalised system of appointing regulators, provisions for avoidance of conflict of interests, by including non-doctors to bring in perspectives other than those of medical profession and finally a well functioning secretariat that would assist the NMC.
 
Before drafting the bill, you invited feedback from public and experts. What was the response? 
We had an overwhelming response from the common public, members of the profession, various associations and experts. In all, we received over 15,000 suggestions, which we have examined and classified into broad categories. The committee constituted to finalise the draft bill is likely to convene shortly to consider these suggestions and take a final view on the bill. 
 
Why are some branches of IMA and associations of specialist doctors protesting against the bill?
I see this more as a response to protect the interests of the doctor community without taking into account the disillusionment of the general citizens with the current system of regulatory framework that has been put in place. I think this is quite short-sighted because alienating the general public by insistence upon continuing with a discredited system, they stand the risk of a complete lack of faith in the profession, which would not be a good situation for any of the concerned stakeholders.
 
Many ask if on similar lines, the government would scrap bodies like Bar Council of India, the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India and replace them with nominated bodies.
 
At present there is no proposal at the NITI Aayog to consider changes in any other professional regulatory bodies; but it is also true that we do not have a scathing indictment of any other body by parliament (representing the sovereign will of the people) as in regard to the MCI. 
 
(The interview appears in October 16-31, 2016 edition of Governance Now)

Comments

 

Other News

Thugs of Hindustan

This story may sound apocryphal but it was recounted by LK Advani in one of his casual conversations. Talking about Morarji Desai, he said that despite his idiosyncrasies, he was a man of impeccable integrity. To buttress his point Advani recalled this incident: After the Janata Party formed the government

IRCTC listing still lingering despite clearance in 2017

Ministry of railways’ decision of holding the listing of Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) has exposed its seriousness in listing its public enterprises in stock exchanges. Although the decision was taken one year back, the national transporter does not have a com

Delhi crisis shows failure of governance, says ex Delhi chief secy

The tussle between the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and lieutenant governor of Delhi Anil Baijal has entered into its fourth day on Thursday. With no immediate solution to the ongoing ego-tussle, citizens are the mute sufferers.  Umesh Sehgal, former chief secretary of Delhi, feels that instead of

The steel frame in peril

As a nervous, young IAS aspirant in 1977, I remember being thrilled to see my name in the newspapers when the list of successful candidates was published. Indeed, I was hoping to be allotted my home state, Kerala, but knew that my rank in the exams did not make that possible. Yet, I cannot deny being a lit

Sitharaman unveils BEL’s 16 MW solar power plant

 A 16 MW grid-connected solar power plant set up by Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) was unveiled by defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman at Heavy Vehicle Factory (HVF) in Avadi on June 8.   BEL is establishing energy security for the ordnance factory estates under the Viabil

Govt plans to install 300 mn tonnes of steel capacity by 2030, says steel minister

Chaudhary Birender Singh says SAIL is at par with any other international steel enterprise   Union minister of steel Chaudhary Birender Singh has said that SAIL is a major contributor of the country’s steel production industry and is foremost in terms of production tech

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter