Law and its implementation safeguard women's rights

To start with, the minimum age for marriage should be made 21 years for women, allowing them to complete graduation at least

thesaishyam

Sai Shyam Appannagari | May 10, 2011



When society is changing with the new spirit of the young generation, there should be a change in our law and its implementations. It’s a shame that in India law is not equally applied in villages, towns and cities.

The first issue to be discussed in public is enabling the law, equally, in all places. The second issue is, there should be alteration in law from time to time and generation to generation and elections to elections. The law that is formulated in the 1990s is not applicable now. It has to be reformulated according to the present-day trends with a value-based outlook.

In India, especially in Indian villages, more than 50 percent girls are married before the age of 18. Problems faced by a girl who is married at the age of 16 are undetermined. In a case study by a non-profit organisation in Tamil Nadu, many facts were revealed. It seems that the child marriages suppress the skill-set and the confidence levels of the girl. The government has to make certain policies that can give freedom for women.

India can be an independent nation only when women in India are given freedom to express and implement their thoughts. A nation can be a safer place, only when women are respected. It's the responsibility of every citizen to respect women by protecting her rights.

There are many solutions to safeguard the women rights. The minimum age limit for marriage should be increased to 21years. That means that the child is at least allowed to complete her degree courses, without any disturbances and responsibilities. Because in India, getting married is becoming a responsible person towards their families.

It would be a better even if the government implements the 18-year limit for girls with strict police inspections and sever punishments for offending the law. Child marriage is a violation of human rights in India. Stopping child marriages is the only major step that the government has to be taken for the development of our nation. The summary of the research on child marriages is: Abolishing child marriages is the initial step for making India a developed nation. Whatever may be the debates on child marriages, the situation of a girl married at an age below 18 is a helpless condition.

Comments

 

Other News

Harnessing the demographic capital: how effective are skilling programmes?

Probing data concerning increased job creation and the decline in unemployment has been holding the attention of economists and been subject of discussions in several think tanks in the preceding months. The NITI Aayog reports that 3.53 million new jobs were created between September 2017 and February 2018

It`s time to Unlock now, with economic focus

With Lockdown 4 ending Sunday, the home ministry has issued new guidelines to fight COVID-19 and for phased re-opening of areas outside the Containment Zones. The guidelines, issued based on extensive consultations held with states and UTs, will be effective from June 1 till June 30. The first phase of reo

Small kitchen gardens turn saviours for Gujarat tribal families

When the whole world is fighting COVID-19, food and nutrition security has become a major issue. The pandemic has aggravated the existing food crisis in India, especially in rural and tribal regions. There has been less availability of fresh foods in most parts of the country, and the tribal community has

India will set example of post-Covid-19 economic revival: Modi

India is determined to “set an example” for the rest of the word in the post-pandemic economic revival, prime minister Narendra Modi has said, underling the need to become self-reliant. “There is also a widespread debate on how the economies of various countries, including

3,543 ‘Shramik Special’ trains transport 48 lakh people in 26 days

Close to 48 lakh migrant labourers have been able to reach home from the cities they were working in, as the Indian Railways have run a total of 3,543 “Sharmik Special” trains from May 1. Following the home ministry order regarding the movement by special trains of migrant worker

How Jeevan Raths have helped 52,000 migrants in Maharashtra

Before the novel coronavirus hit it, Mumbai about 10-12 lakh labourers from elsewhere had made it their home. The figure for the state of Maharashtra was another 18-20 lakh. As the pandemic spread and the Maximum City emerged as the worst-hit place in India, all economic activities came to an end, and with



Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter