BRICS bank gets KV Kamath as its first head

The bank will finance infrastructure projects in BRICS nations with 40 percent population of the world

GN Bureau | May 11, 2015


#KV Kamath   #ICICI Bank   #World Bank   #BRICS   #bank   #Brazil  

KV Kamath has been elected as the chief of $50-billion BRICS New Development Bank, which aims to fund infrastructure projects in developing nations.  The bank looks to be an alternative to other multi-lateral agencies with the focus on the development agenda of BRICS countries.

At the BRICS summit in Brazil last year India was accepted as the head of the development bank. China and India will preside over its operations for the first six years, followed by five-year terms for Brazil and then Russia, leaders of the five-country group announced at the 6th BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) summit.

The BRICS countries comprise over one-fifth of the global economy at nearly $16 trillion in GDP and 40 per cent of the world's population.

Kamat is ICICI Bank's non-executive chairman and chairman of IT giant Infosys. It will be headquartered in Shanghai, China. He has a degree in mechanical engineering and did his management studies at the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad.

Kamath has had served at the Asian Development Bank. Kamath is known for his views on low interest rates and optimistic outlook.  At ICICI Bank he pioneered bold fund raising programmes, expanding the scope of financial markets, funding middle-class consumption and enabling global dreams of Indian companies.

What is BRICS bank?
The NDB has been given $50 billion in initial capital. The BRICS bank appears to work on an equal-share voting basis, with each of the five signatories contributing $10 billion. The capital base is to be used to finance infrastructure and “sustainable development” projects in the BRICS countries initially, but other low- and middle-income countries will be able buy in and apply for funding. BRICS countries have also created a $100 billion Contingency Reserve Arrangement (CRA), meant to provide additional liquidity protection to member countries during balance of payments problems. The CRA is being funded 41 percent by China, 18 percent from Brazil, India, and Russia, and 5 percent from South Africa.

Developing nations hope that BRICS bank/CRA may eventually challenge World Bank-IMF hegemony over matters such as:  funding for basic services, emergency assistance, policy lending, and funding to conflict-affected states.

Comments

 

Other News

The mapping of India

 This is the 250th year since the inception of the Survey of India that has been mapping the boundaries since 1767. Archana Mishra spoke to Dr Swarna Subba Rao, former surveyor general of India, who retired in June this year.  He joined the department as a deputy superintending surveyor in 1983 a

An ODF experiment that succeeded

An experiment carried out to make Uttar Pradesh’s Bijnor district Open Defecation Free (ODF) succeeded due to an official’s innovative approach, noted a World Bank blog.   The blog “Compressed demand”: How Uttar Pradesh is making sure rural sanitation subs

Finding a diplomatic way through political instability

As an emerging global power and the most powerful state in South Asia, India has been perennially concerned about protracted political instability and resultant social turmoil in Afghanistan during the past few decades. Indeed, India’s engagement in the realm of development cooperation, since the o

Kashmir’s Bloody Money Trail

Till the National Investigation Agency (NIA) caught up with him in Delhi on August 17, 70-year-old Zahoor Ahmad Shah Watali, a businessman, was indeed one of the most powerful persons in Kashmir valley. He was known to wield enormous clout in the corridors of power, both in Srinagar and Delhi. His influenc

Did media trial impact Aarushi-Hemraj murder case?

Did media trial impact Aarushi-Hemraj murder case?

Food security: Solution lies in traditional food

After spending almost a month among tribals of Mandla in Madhya Pradesh, I can confidently say that by restricting ourselves to Public Distribution System (PDS), we cannot solve the food security issues of the country.   The problem is graver. In a district like Mandla, where aboriginals like Bai



Video

Dhanteras today, know subh muhurat for shopping and puja

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter