Here’s why world will be difficult for children by 2030

Poverty, illiteracy, early deaths to haunt the world even in 2030 if the issues related to children are not addressed on time

GN Bureau | July 1, 2016


#UNICEF   #Child Rights   #Children   #SDG  


About 69 million children (under five) will die from mostly preventable causes, 167 million children will live in poverty, and 750 million children would have been married off by 2030. The UNICEF in its state of the children of the world report 2016 has predicted following deadly possibilities for children by 2030 (target year for Sustainable Development Goals) unless the world focuses on issues pertaining to them.

Here is what the report has predicted:
 

  • There will be 3.6 million children deaths (under 5 years of age) in that particular year alone. A total of 69 million such deaths would have occurred between 2016 and 2030. At present almost 80 percent of global child deaths occurred in South Asia and Sub-Saharan region and almost where half of the global child deaths occurred in five countries including India.

 

  • Five countries will account for more than half of the global burden of under-five deaths. India’s share would be 17 percent of the total.


 

  • The global maternal mortality rate will be around 161 deaths per 100,000 live births. This number would be five times the maternal mortality rate of high-income countries in 1990.

 

  • Pneumonia would remain the second biggest killer of children (under five years of age) and preterm birth complications will remain the first.

 

  • If nothing is done to control child marriages, almost 950 million women will have been married as children by 2030, up from more than 700 million today. By 2050, almost half of the world’s child brides will be African.

 

  • There could be over 60 million primary school aged children still out of school.


 

  • Based on current trends, low-income countries in 2030 will not be on track to achieve universal primary and lower secondary school completion until around the turn of the next country.

 

  • Providing universal pre-primary, primary and lower secondary education in low-income and lower-middle-income countries by 2030 will cost an estimated $340 billion a year.

 

  • With the current trends, in 2030, 167 million children will live in extreme poverty and nine out of 10 children in extreme poverty will live in sub-Saharan Africa.


 

  • Approximately 2,50,000 additional deaths will occur annually through 2030 from malnutrition, malaria, diarrhea and heat stress attributed to climate change.


Read full report here




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