MCI gets third secy in two years

IPS officer’s selection raises questions on eligibility


Pankaj Kumar | April 18, 2013

RP Meena, an IPS officer of Odisha cadre, is the new secretary of the Medical Council of India (MCI), the statutory body regulating medical colleges, affiliations of new colleges and registration of doctors. He was currently director in the central vigilance office of the health ministry.

MCI additional secretary Prasanna Raj confirmed the development. Last week, Governance Now reported that MCI secretary Sanjay Srivastava was quitting due to alleged harassment from board chairman Dr KK Talwar. [Read the full story here: Another MCI secretary on way out?]

Dr Talwar had faced similar accusations from Srivastava’s predecessor, Dr Sangeeta Sharma who quit in March 2012, and deputy secretary Reena Nayyar.

"Meena will be the third secretary in two years. This reflects poorly on MCI," said a senior officer in the council on condition of anonymity.

It is unusual that an IPS officer has been picked for the post, as several officers refused to take up the job. Sube Singh, deputy secretary in the council, was one of them.

"How can an IPS officer without knowledge of the field of medical education can run the council?" asked retired additional secretary Dr Prem Kumar, who served as officer on special duty when Dr Sarin was chairman of the MCI.

Last year, Dr Sharma was removed on the ground that she did not fulfill eligibility criteria, especially that she did not have 15 years of medical teaching experience.

Dr Sharma said, "They were so not satisfied with my experience, and now they have brought an officer who does not have medical background. Will he be able to understand the requirements of post-graduation courses and super-speciality courses?"

In 2010, as also in 1990, the MCI was dissolved and the health ministry appointed its secretary.

Dr Sharma indeed has the requisite teaching experience too, but authorities do not consider her teaching stint at the Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Science (IHBAS).

"Dr Sharma was removed on the ground of trivial issues like not counting her teaching experience at IHBAS since it is only an institute and not a medical college; but on the other hand an IPS officer with no medical background and no teaching experience is being given the top administrative post in MCI," said Amrendra Sharan, a former additional solicitor general and senior lawyer of the supreme court.



Other News

NHRC seeks more teeth

The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) is waiting for a hearing in the Supreme Court on October 26 as it seeks more powers. Its restricted recommendatory and advisory role could be further enhanced and it could ensure that recommendations are followed by the state governments. “A matte

Be cautious or else you may fall prey to debit card fraud

 The news of vital data of thousands of debit cards being exposed to fraudsters has sent many into a tizzy, with people now calling up their banks and looking up Google on what to do next. Though banks have been sending alerts, to all those whose cards are found to be at risk, along with a host of to-

Farmers in Cauvery delta region fear crop failure

The supreme court has asked Karnataka to release 2,000 cusecs of Cauvery water to Tamil Nadu every day till further orders. However, farmers living near Cauvery delta region are worried as their livelihood is at stake as the quantity of water is too less to grow Samba (rice), a major crop (grown during Sep

APO secy-general pushes for “Smart Initiative” at 57th WSM

Asian Productivity Organization (APO) secretary-general Santhi Kanoktanaporn during the 57th Workshop Meeting (WSM) of Heads of National Productivity Organizations (NPOs) announced that the organization would be taking up a myriad of technology-enabled initiatives to push forward the goals of the Roadmap t

India trails badly in world ranking on security, fundamental rights, justice

India ranks 66 out of 113 countries in terms of how the rule of law is experienced by its people, says World Justice Project (WJP) Rule of Law Index. The report has put India behind 65 countries including Nepal, Thailand and Malaysia. India bags an overall score of 0.51 while Denmark which ranks one in the

Do you know how much the govt pays to print a Rs 10 note?

Hard cash is not free. In fact, the Rs 10 note costs between 70 paise and Rs 1.12 to print.   An RTI response on the printing cost of currency notes has revealed that different public sector undertakings have different printing-cost and sale-price (to the government) for currency


Current Issue


Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter