Media in Hisar: A hostage to self-image

Media should stop behaving like little sissy boys, always complaining and expecting some sort of special treatment

bikram

Bikram Vohra | November 20, 2014


Baba Rampal followers staging a protest outside Jantar Mantar in New Delhi on November 18.
Baba Rampal followers staging a protest outside Jantar Mantar in New Delhi on November 18.

Indian Media’s self absorption with itself and the canopy of importance under which it dwells has changed a great deal in the half century since we became journalists. This was profoundly discernible in the coverage of the Hisar ‘hostage’ situation at Baba Rampal’s citadel of dishonour when the fate of 15,000 civilians and an army of policemen facing their hostility was sidelined like one of those shunting trains for the stellar show of the evening called, “Look, look, the media is being beaten.”

Certainly all violence must be abhorred and unprovoked or not deserves to be condemned. There, having said that, a journalist stays with his story. He doesn’t use his power to sell himself, bloodstained or not. He reports.

To leave the story you are covering and make your pain central to the issue is an arrogance that borders on an absurd concept that the press is above the law and is parked on a pedestal.

These journalists were in a war zone. They were coming in the line of fire. They were interfering in an ongoing operation that had already run up casualties.

You want a Pultizer, go for it but take the risk of coming against some bad boys.

In many parts of the world where hot spots are flaring journalists risk their lives for a good story or even a singular photograph which speaks a thousand words.

They are embedded, they hear shells firing, they take on mortar fire and sometimes they get killed. They also get captured and gutted.

But they do not use their channels to blather on and on about a broken arm or some crushed equipment.

We were taught no one helps you with your job. I have covered wars and air crashes, been shot at, hit a mine, and gone into forbidden zones and taken the chance scared out of my mind, only the hubris of youth allowing me to do things I would not do now. But we never cried about it, we followed our story. That is all there was. We were never the story.

But this new ‘midddya’ approach baffles me. They are like little sissy boys always moaning and complaining and expecting some sort of special treatment. Why?

Somewhere there has to be a balance between the watchdogs and their role as protectors.

You want to be a reporter, you report, stop moaning. Take that risk.
 

Comments

 

Other News

Yogi in politics, TN industries shift base and, how to end the Maharaja’s misery

Everyone in Yogi Adityanath`s office declares that Yogi’s political career is founded on the work carried out from there, first when he was mahant of the influential temple, and then as an MP. Vijendra Singh, who works at the office, says “It’s because of these letters that Yogiji has n

A fifth of Rs 29 lakh crore are NPAs

Banks have advanced a staggering Rs 29,46,060 crore to the industrial sector, of which Rs 6.93 lakh crore are non-performing assets (NPAs).   Finance minister Arun Jaitley informed

Demonetisation not meant to change cash use by people: Harvard economist

 Here are 10 things that Kenneth Rogoff, Thomas D Cabot professor of public policy, department of economics, Harvard University, and author of `The Curse of Cash`, said about demonetisation at the Delhi Economics Conclave 2017: 1. The core idea for demone

Ashok Malik is press secy to president

As Ram Nath Kovind readies to take charge as president, the government is forming his team, naming three officials.    Ashok Malik, former journalist and commentator known for his pro-right views, will serve as the press secretary to the president. Bharat Lal, Gujarat&rs

To understand Modi saga, look at the Vaghela story

Back in the early 1990s, Shankarsinh Vaghela was (or at least perceived to be) more popular of the two people running the BJP show in Gujarat. Today, the other man is the prime minister, and Vaghela is reduced to a footnote – albeit an important one – in the Narendra Modi saga. &n

‘Not just Muslims, everyone is in fear and awe of Yogi Adityanath’

At 70, Dr Aziz Ahmad, a well-known homeopath and politician now with Congress, still has a busy practice in Abu Bazaar, in old Gorakhpur. During working hours, the lane in which he has a clinic becomes jam-packed with patients and their vehicles. People speak of naming the lane after him.





Video

कश्मीर पर तीसरे पक्ष की मध्यस्थता स्वीकार नहीं - महबूबा

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter