No tears shed for seven troopers killed fighting Maoists

Threat from internal enemies is far more serious than the one from Pakistan

ajay

Ajay Singh | January 9, 2013


A CRPF team in Chhattisgarh, battling the Maoists
A CRPF team in Chhattisgarh, battling the Maoists

Despite the existence of the Geneva Convention, the inherently brutal nature is a typical characteristic of an army. In the Kargil war, there were many stories of bestiality and torture that the Pakistan army resorted to against Indian defence personnel. Surely there would be similar stories on the other side of the fence which would have projected the Indian army in a similar vein. Perhaps, to expect benevolent behaviour from any army is expecting too much.

But the killing of two army jawans on a peaceful LoC on January 8 violates all codes of conduct of a professional army. Even in the past Pakistan has resorted to beheading Indian soldiers by secretly deploying its special forces trained as killing machines on the silent borders. Of course, Pakistan would not be naive to expect the Indian army to sit back idly and grunt. There are all indications that the peace process between the two neighbours will be held hostage to jingoism from both the sides.

With Pakistan as an enemy, the Indian response has often been irrationally hysterical. Despite the fact that the Indian army has capability and resources to outdo the Pakistani army in all respects, jingoism appears often misplaced. This becomes all the more glaring in the manner in which the debate in the electronic and print media conveniently ignore the killing of seven CRPF jawans in an ambush with Maoists in Jharkhand on January 7. And their killing by Maoists was no less brutal than the beheading of the army jawans by the Pakistani soldiers. At least two dozen CRPF personnel were injured in the incident.

In fact, the killing of the CRPF jawans fighting for internal security has become such a routine that it is largely ignored in the mainstream discourse. Hundreds of trained troopers of CRPF are getting killed while doing their duty for internal security. And by all accounts, the threat from the internal enemies is far more serious than the external threat from Pakistan whose nose has been effectively rubbed by the Indian army many a time.
 

 

Comments

 

Other News

“Key milestones achieved in Assam”

In an interview with Governance Now, Anil Kumar Jha, special DGP, CID, Assam, who is also nodal officer for the CCTNS project, speaks of what the system in its present form has helped his state achieve. What is the current status of CCTNS in Assam and its outcome?

Crime tracking project: Bugged from the beginning

A stand-off between the ministry of home affairs (MHA) and software development firm Wipro seems to have long held up the Rs 2,000 crore crime and criminal tracking network and systems (CCTNS) project, conceptualised ten years ago. The project aims to digitise and connect all police stations in the country

Activists question displacement and dispossession of marginalised communities

Questioning the development model pushed ahead for profit oriented growth, social and political activists, academicians, financial analysts and civil society organisations are holding a three day confluence of Peoples’ Convention on Infrastructure Financing in Mumbai.     &nb

The enemy within

About one-fourth of India’s elderly face abuse at the hands of those they trust the most – the son (52%)  followed  by the daughter in law (34%),spouse/partner (14%), daughter(6%)  grandchild (6%), son in law(3%), parent(1%) and care giver(1%), reveals a report by the HelpAge Ind

Who has been investing in India through Mauritius?

The official statistics provided by the department of industrial policy and promotion (DIPP) under the ministry of commerce and industry shows that between January 2000 and December 2017, India received $368 billion of foreign direct investment (FDI). It also says that Mauritius was the source of $125 bill

The neighbour and the valley

The declaration communicated through the director general of military operations (DGMO) of Pakistan and India on May 29, 2018, to implement the ceasefire agreement of 2003 between the two countries in “letter and  spirit” has opened up an opportunity to restore peace in the disturbed Kashm

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter