Over 3,000 adolescents die every day in the world: WHO

Road traffic injuries, lower respiratory infections, and suicide are the biggest causes of death among adolescents.

GN Bureau | May 18, 2017


#respiratory infections   #road traffic injuries   #adolescent deaths   #WHO   #suicide  


More than 3,000 adolescents die every day, totalling 1.2 million deaths a year, from largely preventable causes, according to a report from WHO and partners. In 2015, more than two-thirds of these deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries in Africa and South-East Asia. Road traffic injuries, lower respiratory infections, and suicide are the biggest causes of death among adolescents.

Most of these deaths can be prevented with good health services, education and social support. But in many cases, adolescents who suffer from mental health disorders, substance use, or poor nutrition cannot obtain critical prevention and care services – either because the services do not exist, or because they do not know about them, said a press communiqué issued in Geneva.
 

Top 5 causes of death for all adolescents aged 10–19 years in 2015
Cause of death Number of deaths
1. Road traffic injury 115 302
2. Lower respiratory infections 72 655
3. Self-harm 67 149
4. Diarrhoeal diseases 63 575
5. Drowning 57 125

In addition, many behaviours that impact health later in life, such as physical inactivity, poor diet, and risky sexual health behaviours, begin in adolescence.
 
"Adolescents have been entirely absent from national health plans for decades," says Dr Flavia Bustreo, assistant director-general, WHO. "Relatively small investments focused on adolescents now will not only result in healthy and empowered adults who thrive and contribute positively to their communities, but it will also result in healthier future generations, yielding enormous returns."
 
Top 5 causes of death for males aged 10–19 years in 2015
Cause of death Number of deaths
1. Road traffic injury 88 590
2. Interpersonal violence 42 277
3. Drowning 40 847
4. Lower respiratory infections 36 018
5. Self-harm 34 650

Data in the report, Global accelerated action for the health of adolescents (AA-HA!): Guidance to support country implementation, reveal stark differences in causes of death when separating the adolescent group by age (younger adolescents aged 10–14 years and older ones aged 15–19 years) and by sex. The report also includes the range of interventions – from seat-belt laws to comprehensive sexuality education – that countries can take to improve their health and well-being and dramatically cut unnecessary deaths.
 
Road injuries top cause of death of adolescents, disproportionately affecting boys. In 2015, road injuries were the leading cause of adolescent death among 10–19-year-olds, resulting in approximately 115 000 adolescent deaths. Older adolescent boys aged 15–19 years experienced the greatest burden. Most young people killed in road crashes are vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.
 
Top 5 causes of death for females aged 10–19 years in 2015
Cause of death Number of deaths
1. Lower respiratory infections 36 637
2. Self-harm 32 499
3. Diarrhoeal diseases 32 194
4. Maternal conditions 28 886
5. Road traffic injury 26 712

However, differences between regions are stark. Looking only at low- and middle-income countries in Africa, communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, lower respiratory infections, meningitis, and diarrhoeal diseases are bigger causes of death among adolescents than road injuries.
 
Lower respiratory infections and pregnancy complications take toll on girls’ health.
 
The leading cause of death for younger adolescent girls aged 10–14 years are lower respiratory infections, such as pneumonia – often a result of indoor air pollution from cooking with dirty fuels. Pregnancy complications, such as haemorrhage, sepsis, obstructed labour, and complications from unsafe abortions, are the top cause of death among 15–19-year-old girls.
 
Suicide and accidental death from self-harm were the third cause of adolescent mortality in 2015, resulting in an estimated 67,000 deaths. Self-harm largely occurs among older adolescents, and globally it is the second leading cause of death for older adolescent girls. It is the leading or second cause of adolescent death in Europe and South-East Asia.
 
"Improving the way health systems serve adolescents is just one part of improving their health," says Dr Anthony Costello, director, Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, WHO. "Parents, families, and communities are extremely important, as they have the greatest potential to positively influence adolescent behaviour and health."
 
The AA-HA! Guidance recommends interventions across sectors, including comprehensive sexuality education in schools; higher age limits for alcohol consumption; mandating seat-belts and helmets through laws; reducing access to and misuse of firearms; reducing indoor air pollution through cleaner cooking fuels; and increasing access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene. It also provides detailed explanations of how countries can deliver these interventions with adolescent health programmes.
 

 

Comments

 

Other News

More tests, more oxygen: PM spells out focus

The expansion of the testing and treatment network and more availability of oxygen top the government’s priorities in combating the spread of Covid-19, prime minister Narendra Modi indicated on Tuesday. The PM chaired a video conference with the chief ministers of all states and UTs o

Now, mandatory Covid test to enter Maharashtra

From Wednesday, all passengers travelling to Maharashtra from the NCR of Delhi, Rajasthan, Gujarat and Goa – the four states with high numbers of Covid-19 infection in recent days – will have to compulsorily provide RT_PCR tests before boarding flights and trains.    

India’s active caseload remains below 5%, recovery rate remains above 93%

India’s present active caseload (4,43,486) is 4.85% of the total positive cases, and has been sustained below the 5% mark, the health ministry said in a bulletin Monday. The Recovery Rate continues to be above 93% as 93.68% of all cases have recovered as of date. In the 24 hours to Mon

Covid-19 too will be history one day: Dr. Harsh Vardhan

Covid-19 will soon be a “past episode”, Dr. Harsh Vardhan, minister for health and family welfare, has said, hoping that “vaccines available very soon, and the cases will significantly go down in the next few months”. “It is not the first one and definitely not

India’s reforms could support medium-term growth

The revival of the government’s reform agenda in response to the coronavirus pandemic shock has the potential to raise India’s medium-term growth rate, Fitch Ratings has said in a new analysis, while also taking note of downside pressures to growth and adding that it will take time to assess wh

Govt working towards resolving MSME issues through banking reforms: Patra

Acknowledging that much needs to be done in the banking sector, BJP national spokesperson Sambit Patra has said that the government was working on the nitty-gritties. “As far as the Indian banking system is concerned, a lot is still to be done and rest assured work is under progress. T



Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter