Project Tiger nets huge success, Tiger population is up

Tiger population in India has seen a growth of 30% with 2,226 tigers in 47 reserves

GN Bureau | January 20, 2015



A sustained effort, even from the government, pays handsome dividends. This has been demonstrated by the Project Tiger. The national animal is thriving.

Tiger population in India has seen a growth of 30% with 2,226 tigers in 47 reserves in 2014. Naturally, the government is happy. "While the tiger population is falling in the world, it is rising in India. It is a great news," environment minister Prakash Javadekar said.

"Never before such an exercise has been taken. We have unique photographs of 80% of tigers," he said, talking about the year-long survey the helped prepare the estimation report.

Tiger population had dipped in 2006 to an alarming 1,411 from over 3,000 in early 2000, prompting the government to form a Tiger Task Force and tighten protection measures. And the conservation efforts have paid off as the new figures show.

India has been struggling to hold on to its last few hundreds of big cats left in the wild because of rampant poaching that feeds an illegal international trade, which supplies animal parts to the traditional Chinese medicine market, and also habitat loss, prey depletion and poor management of tiger reserves.

The government had launched the ‘Project Tiger’ in 1973 and over the years increased tiger reserves from 9 to 47. In 2007, it constituted a multidisciplinary Tiger and Other Endangered Species Crime Control Bureau (Wildlife Crime Control Bureau) to effectively control illegal trade in wildlife.

Rajesh Gopal, member secretary of the National Tiger Conservation Authority, said the estimation drive was a massive exercise across India which showed improvement in tiger numbers in many states.

Javadekar conferred the best reserve award on Panna Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh. Annamallai Tiger Reserve (Tamil Nadu) got the award for best communication and Periyar (Kerala) was rewarded for involving local communities. The Melghat reserve (Maharashtra) got award for smooth village relocation from tiger reserve.

Comments

 

Other News

Developed states not adding to skill sets: Study

The most economically developed states are not adequately adding to skillsets, which may result in severe shortages of skilled manpower in the coming years, according to an ASSOCHAM-Thought Arbitrage Paper.  Maharashtra

The young dalit, angry and Azad

It’s a hot May afternoon and Connaught Place is almost deserted. But KL Mahar and Anjana Mahar, a middle-aged dalit couple, are striding briskly towards Delhi’s famed protest square, near the Jantar Mantar, to get a glimpse of Chandrashekhar Azad. Popularly called Ravan, Chandrashekhar

Tedros becomes the first African to head WHO

“Call me Tedros,” the newly elected director-general (DG) of the World Health Organisation (WHO), Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, told a Chinese reporter at a press conference held after he was elected on May 23. “The issue is: in Ethiopia we don’t have surnames, and also my wife o

Should there be a national test for teachers?

Should there be a national test for teachers?

Government sanctions new posts to hire cyber security professionals

The government has sanctioned 111 posts of cyber security professionals for the Indian computer emergency response team (ICERT) under the ministry of electronics and information technology (MEITY), according to a ministry official, who added that the posts were sanctioned earlier this year. 

Bhutan’s pursuit of happiness, shortage of health sub-centres in UP, and role of digitisation in IGNOU

In many ways the story of Gross National Happiness in a country is the story of Bhutan and its modern history. There are two major transition points in Bhutan’s recent history, the beginning of the monarchy in 1907, and the transition to a Constitutional monarchy in 2008, and the pursuit of happine



Video

पंजाब में हाई अलर्ट

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter