UN general assembly acts on antimicrobial resistance

So far, only three specific health issues - HIV, non-communicable diseases, and Ebola – have been discussed in past sessions of the assembly

GN Bureau | September 22, 2016


#UN general assembly   #UNGA   #United Nations   #antimicrobial resistance   #non communicable disease   #Ebola   #HE Peter Thomson  
UN general assembly acts on antimicrobial resistance
UN general assembly acts on antimicrobial resistance

For the first time at the 71st session of the UN general assembly, world leaders laid thrust on the need to curb the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. So far, only three specific health issues - HIV, non-communicable diseases, and Ebola – have been discussed in past sessions of the assembly.
 
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) happens when bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi develop resistance against medicines that were previously able to cure them. It is considered the greatest and most urgent global risk requiring international and national attention. 
 
The high-level meeting convened by the president of the assembly session, HE Peter Thomson said, “Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievement of the sustainable development goals and requires a global response. Member states have today agreed upon a strong political declaration that provides a good basis for the international community to move forward. No one country, sector or organisation can address this issue alone.” 
 
Common and life-threatening infections like pneumonia, gonorrhoea, and post-operative infections, as well as HIV, tuberculosis and malaria are increasingly becoming untreatable because of AMR. Left unchecked, AMR is predicted to have significant social, health security, and economic repercussions that will seriously undermine the development of countries.
 
Dr Margaret Chan, director general, WHO, said, “Antimicrobial resistance poses a fundamental threat to human health, development, and security. The commitments made today must now be translated into swift, effective, lifesaving actions across the human, animal and environmental health sectors. We are running out of time.” 
 
The high levels of AMR already seen in the world today are the result of overuse and misuse of antibiotics and other antimicrobials in humans, animals (including farmed fish), and crops, as well as the spread of residues of these medicines in soil, crops and water. 
 
Leaders recognised the need for stronger systems to monitor drug-resistant infections and the volume of antimicrobials used in humans, animals and crops, as well as increased international cooperation and funding.
 
They pledged to strengthen regulation of antimicrobials, improve knowledge and awareness, and promote best practices — as well as to foster innovative approaches using alternatives to antimicrobials and new technologies for diagnosis and vaccines.
 
The blueprint for tackling AMR was developed in 2015 by the World Health Organization (WHO) in coordination with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).
 
“AMR is a problem not just in our hospitals, but on our farms and in our food, too. Agriculture must shoulder its share of responsibility, both by using antimicrobials more responsibly and by cutting down on the need to use them, through good farm hygiene,” said Dr José Graziano da Silva, director general of FAO.
 
Leaders at the UN meeting called on WHO, FAO and OIE, in collaboration with the World Bank and other relevant stakeholders, to coordinate their planning and actions and to report back to the UN General Assembly in September 2018.

Comments

 

Other News

IRCTC listing still lingering despite clearance in 2017

Ministry of railways’ decision of holding the listing of Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) has exposed its seriousness in listing its public enterprises in stock exchanges. Although the decision was taken one year back, the national transporter does not have a com

Delhi crisis shows failure of governance, says ex Delhi chief secy

The tussle between the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and lieutenant governor of Delhi Anil Baijal has entered into its fourth day on Thursday. With no immediate solution to the ongoing ego-tussle, citizens are the mute sufferers.  Umesh Sehgal, former chief secretary of Delhi, feels that instead of

The steel frame in peril

As a nervous, young IAS aspirant in 1977, I remember being thrilled to see my name in the newspapers when the list of successful candidates was published. Indeed, I was hoping to be allotted my home state, Kerala, but knew that my rank in the exams did not make that possible. Yet, I cannot deny being a lit

Sitharaman unveils BEL’s 16 MW solar power plant

 A 16 MW grid-connected solar power plant set up by Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) was unveiled by defence minister Nirmala Sitharaman at Heavy Vehicle Factory (HVF) in Avadi on June 8.   BEL is establishing energy security for the ordnance factory estates under the Viabil

Govt plans to install 300 mn tonnes of steel capacity by 2030, says steel minister

Chaudhary Birender Singh says SAIL is at par with any other international steel enterprise   Union minister of steel Chaudhary Birender Singh has said that SAIL is a major contributor of the country’s steel production industry and is foremost in terms of production tech

BHEL to set up two solar photovoltaic plants in Gujarat

 BHEL has bagged two orders, valued at Rs 125 crore, for setting up solar photovoltaic (SPV) power plants in Gujarat. Both the plants will be built at Gujarat Solar Park in Gujarat. The first order for setting up a 20 MW SPV power plant has been placed on BHEL by Gujarat Alkalies and Chemica

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter