What happened in Nepal?

The quake which rocked Nepal on Saturday was the strongest in the region in more than 80 years

GN Bureau | April 27, 2015


#nepal earthquake   #nepal earthquake prediction   #earthquake   #earthquake prediction   #earthquake aftershocks   #aftershocks   #epicentre earthquake nepal   #kathmandu   #earthquake death toll  

What happened in Nepal and how big is the damage?

Seismologists say that the quake happened on what is known as a “thrust fault”. This describes the situation when one piece of the Earth’s crust is moving beneath another piece. In this case, it’s the Indian plate that is moving north at 45 millimetres a year under the Eurasian plate to the north.

United States Geological Survey (USGS) calculations estimate the damage between $100 million and $10 billion. Scientists estimate that more than 105 million people felt moderate shaking during the quake. A UN report says that nearly 6.6 million and 40 percent of the country is affected by the quake.

READ:
Nepal earthquake: 3,200 dead and counting


Check here for  fatalities and economic losses estimated by the USGS


What are Aftershocks?

An earthquake that follows a large magnitude earthquake called, “main shock” and originates in or around the rupture zone of the main shock. Generally, major earthquakes are followed by a number of aftershocks, which show a decreasing trend in magnitude and frequency with time.

Around 55 aftershocks occured in Nepal in two days after the massive 7.9 magnitude hit the country on April 25.


Why earthquakes occur?

 
Going by the plate tectonics concept,  the  Indian  plate  is  moving  in  a  north, north-east direction  and  colliding  with  Eurasian  plate  along  the  Himalayan  mountain  range.  This collision is responsible for the formation of faults such as boundary thrust, central thrust in and along  the  Himalayan regions. Almost  all  the  major  earthquakes  in  India  and  its  adjoining  region  occur  along these faults. In brief, earthquakes occur due to forces of geological origin along weak planes called, faults. The earthquakes occurring near plate boundaries such as Himalaya are known as inter-plate earthquakes. Apart  from  earthquakes  from  the  Himalayan  belt,  there  have  been  earthquakes  of relatively lesser magnitude and lesser frequency in the Peninsular region also. Such earthquakes are known  as intra-plate  earthquakes.

   
Classifying earthquakes

    
 

  •     Slight Magnitude up to 4.9 on the Richter Scale

 

  •     Moderate Magnitude 5.0 to 6.9

 

  •     Great Magnitude 7.0 to 7.9

 

  •     Very Great Magnitude 8.0 and more


       Nepal earthquake was 7.9, ie. earthquake of great magnitude.

 

Here is a list of significant earthquakes occurred in and around India


Here is a list of largest and deadliest earthquakes occurred around the world

  

With inputs from USGS and IMD
 

Comments

 

Other News

Is the government spending enough on dalits?

The Narendra Modi government has set aside Rs 52,393 crore in 2017-18 for the welfare of the dalits. On the face of it, the amount is substantial. However, an analysis of the past actual allocation shows that there has in fact been a dip in spending on schemes that are specifically meant only for dalits.

President’s post above politics: Kovind

“I will always try and it is also my belief that the president’s post should be above politics,” said NDA’s presidential candidate Ram Nath Kovind who filed the nomination papers on Friday.   “Since the time I became governor,  I am no longe

Unaffordable sacredness of our cattle

A lot of debate that we witness in the media on the cattle question these days suffer from the disease of speculative utopian imagination of a ‘cow-nation’ and relentless abuses for those beef-eating ‘others’.   Political debates over the question of o

“Gandhi and Tagore are the two Indian authors who redefine civilisation as a moral compass and a space of dialogue”

Ramin Jahanbegloo is a renowned philosopher who is now associated with the Jindal Global University. His latest work, The Decline of Civilization, calls for countering the ‘decivilising’ tendencies of our times by returning to Gandhi and Tagore. Jahanbegloo answered s

Should CBSE prepone the board exams?

Should CBSE prepone the board exams?

Cricket, not just a sport

In this nationalistic age, sports seem to play an important role, and in India, this can be seen during cricket matches. For most, a victory symbolises prestige and supremacy.   On Sunday, India lost to Pakistan in the final match of the ICC Champions Trophy. The defea



Video

कश्मीर में भीड़ ने पीट-पीटकर ली पुलिस अफसर की जान

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter