In conversation with Kavita Krishnamurty

yoshika

Yoshika Sangal | January 20, 2016




Kavita Krishnamurty Subramaniam is a renowned playback singer credited for singing some of the very popular Bollywood songs. Born in Delhi in a Tamil Iyer family, Kavita began her vocal training under Sri Balram Puri (in the Hindustani music) at a very young age. She began her recording career in 1971. At a very young age, she got the opportunity to record a song with Lata Mangeshkar and music composer Hemant Kumar. Since then, she has given voice to several actresses and worked with many music composers including RD Burman and AR Rehman. She has won four Filmfare awards in the best female playback singer category, including three consecutive times from 1994 to 1996. She also received the Padma Shri in 2005. Kavita is married to violinist L Subramaniam.

 
Thing that brought me closer to music: Being a south Indian and having a Bengali upbringing, I think it was in my genes

Happiness to me is: Being around my family members

My favourite song: Pyaar hua chupke se from the movie, 1942: A Love Story, for which I got my first Filmfare award

My low point in life: The day my father passed away, when I was just 21-year-old. He was my icon and I think after that the world ended for me for some time

My favourite pastime: Spending time with my four-year-old granddaughter. I love reading stories to her

The person who inspired me: Protima Bhattacharya, my Bengali aunt who brought me up. She was the one who dreamt of me being a singer and who brought me to Mumbai.

If not a singer: I would be a veterinarian. I love animals, especially dogs. I can spend a whole day with animals without missing human beings

I take care of my health by: Taking a lot of medicines for my bronchitis

My greatest achievement: When I received my Padma Shri from president Abdul Kalam

My idea of comfort food: Bengali kheer made with Bengali gud. All my problems are solved with it

My dream: To travel to rare places like Iceland and Alaska. I’m hoping to go closest to the northern point of the world

Singing reality shows are: Fantastic. The senior generation of our country love sitting at home and listening to youngsters singing. It is
generating a lot of employment as a lot of these children are coming from poor families and this is an excellent platform for them to showcase their talent

My advice to aspiring singers: Never lose hope

I want to be remembered as: Honestly, it would be very egoistic for me to say that I want to be remembered. Apart of being a singer I just want to be a good wife, good mother and a good person

My life mantra: As a musician you should never relax. Your ears and the windows of your mind should always be open

As told to Yoshika Sangal

(The interview appears in the January 1-15, 2016 issue)
 

Comments

 

Other News

Look who’s talking ethics in Karnataka?

 Just after the UP assembly election in 1996, I was among the scores of reporters waiting at Kalyan Singh’s residence, waiting to get the first inkling of the future course of the BJP. The party had secured the maximum seats – 174 out of 425 seats – but was short of the majority mark

Company secretaries are gatekeepers of corporate governance: SEBI Chairman

“Company Secretaries, once known as secretaries to the board and management, have transformed themselves into key managerial and governance professionals. Today they are recognised for their importance on corporate landscape and have become gatekeepers of corporate governance,” said Ajay Tyagi,

Will there be light at the end of the tunnel?

Any good news which promises to bring about qualitative improvement in the lives of people, especially in rural India, is always welcome. It was heartening indeed to learn that every single village in the country now has access to electricity, as announced by the prime minister on April 29. This is most ce

A dry run in Bundelkhand

The paved road, the few concrete houses and men on motorcycles – these are deceptive signs of development in Madralalpur village. Only a couple of weeks ago, Babu, a 47-year-old distressed farmer, had hanged himself from a babool tree. Villagers were gathered at his house as his wife, mother, sister-

Our jobs, their jobs

Statistics has come a long way from the time when British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli observed: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” Statistics is now an accredited branch of applied mathematics; statistical methods are routinely used to prove or disprove the

Why hasty ordinance on rape of minors needs gender balance

Of all offences, it’s the crime of rape that fires public sentiment the most, eliciting an outrage that exceeds the seemingly worst felony of all – murder too. It has probably more to do with the offence and associated gory details staying, even being replayed ruthlessly, in memory with continu

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter