Winter fading. Season's greetings, and groanings

So this is it, then: goodbye balmy rebellion; welcome sultry election.

shantanu

Shantanu Datta | February 24, 2014



I say going out for a post-lunch smoke is becoming a tougher decision to make with each passing day, you say the sun is still fun.

I say the coconut oil in that ugly blue plastic flip-can is starting to become semi-solid even in mornings, you say the monkey cap was always passé.

I say beer is here, you say rum’s still yum.

I say sticks sticking out to scratch your itchy back, you say branches pregnant with possibilities.

That’s how we see the fading winter, you and I.

Now, if those are lousy lines, you can’t blame me. Blame it on the fading winter. Paid news. The Manmohan Singh government’s policy paralysis. The position of stars. The position on the bedside table of that Kama Sutra book that you itch to read each night but are too tired to even pick up. The position of INSAT, OUTSAT or whatever the latest satellite is that is doing the round of this rotund planet. Or whatever.

The Met department says the weather is changing. They will even give you a few rising degrees of truth to prove its point each day. The calendar is in the same gang: February slipping out; March marching in. As is the political class: the muffler is on the way out, as, perhaps, is the muffler man. Kurtas are coming in.

And that, finally, is what it all boils down to. The goodbye versus the doormat – made of jute, with WELCOME writ large in multiple colours in the middle, if you please.

For many, the only season Delhi is tolerable in is the winter. It’s the time when dreamers can sit under the sun (when there is one) and theorise revolution, or draw up sketches of evolution on paper. The heat takes that self-assigned beat off you, making you groan and moan about the realities of the weather, and of friends – of fair-weather variety or otherwise – taking to their wings and flapping away.

This is it, then: goodbye balmy rebellion; welcome sultry election. Or the walk, jog, and finally dash towards it. And along with it a riot of colours, and the taxman. This sure is going to be one taxing summer.

So, whenever you read Eliot (as for me, I don’t; they are all too dense for me, those poets) remember you might be reading it somewhat wrong. April, dear reader, is not the cruellest month. March is.

Comments

 

Other News

NITI Aayog rolls out three year action agenda

 Even as a vision and a strategy agenda is in "advanced stages" of finalisation at NITI Aayog, the government think tank has released a draft three year action agenda for public consultation.  The draft action agenda, divided in seven parts and 24 chapters, proposes to reduce

It’s a cause of worry, says NHRC on killing of 25 CRPF troopers

The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) on Tuesday said it was “disturbed” over the killing of 25 Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) personnel by Naxalites in Chhattisgarh on April 24. The troopers were attacked while on duty for securing road construction work in the Bur

99% complaints filed through Twitter resolved: BSNL

 Twitter Sewa unveiled by the ministry of telecommunications last year to resolve users’ complaints through micro blogging site Twitter has yielded fruitful results by resolving 99 percent of the complaints.   According to BSNL data, as on April 15, 2017, it has receiv

People of Delhi now hate Kejriwal: Vijay Goel

What is your perception about Arvind Kejriwal’s brand of politics?   In Delhi, after the BJP and the Congress, people wanted to give the Aam Aadmi Party a chance. However, after the Delhi assembly polls, his (Kejriwal`s) political fortune has been on the declin

BHEL’s biggest foreign power project takes off in Bangladesh

Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited’s biggest export order, valued at Rs 10,000 crore for setting up 1,320 MW Maitree thermal power project in Bangladesh has taken-off following the issuance of the ‘notice to proceed’ by the developer.   BHEL said that it won a

For a free and open access

Mozilla is working on two separate goals in net neutrality. One is to bring everyone online; ensure that everyone has access to the internet. The other is to ensure that the network should remain open and diverse. We want people to have access to the whole diversity of the internet and not just in



Video

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter