SAIL's special grade steel used to build stealth corvette

SAIL has supplied over 50,000 metric tonnes of defence grade steel to meet naval ships requirements

GN Bureau | October 17, 2017


#SAIL   #naval ship   #Indian navy   #steel   #INS Kiltan  

Maharatna enterprise, Steel Authority of India Ltd. (SAIL) has supplied defence grade micro-alloyed grade of steel (DMR 249A) steel plates for the indigenously built anti-submarine warfare (ASW) stealth corvette INS-Kiltan commissioned into Indian Navy. 

 
SAIL’s integrated functioning across all its plants has again successfully supplied the required quantity of steel for this significant project. 
 
DMR 249A is a low carbon micro-alloyed grade of steel with stringent toughness requirement at sub-zero temperature. SAIL developed this warship grade steel plates for the Indian Navy in collaboration with defence metallurgical research laboratory in Hyderabad. SAIL has been supplying steel for defence sector for a long time and its steel has been used in various other prestigious ship building projects. So far SAIL has supplied more than 50,000 metric tonnes of DMR 249A defence grade steel for naval ships against various requirements.

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