Come visit my home, be my guest

A campaign launched by Shabnam Hashmi appeals to people to visit the house of someone from another community to break socially constructed barriers

pranita

Pranita Kulkarni | July 14, 2017 | New Delhi


#society   #Shabnam Hasmi   #campaign   #communal violence  


After massive participation in the #NotInMyName campaign initiated by filmmaker Saba Dewan – a peaceful protest against rising communal hatred in the country, another campaign along similar lines is being launched by social activist Shabnam Hashmi. 
 
The campaign ‘Mere ghar aa ke to dekho’ (‘Come visit my home, be my guest’) is directed to change the preconceived notions and opinions that we hold about people belonging to another community, class, caste, religion, sexual orientation, language, region etc. 
 
Hashmi has appealed to the people to meet at least one family from a different community in order to understand their life and culture. The objective is simple and direct, people must go to each other's house eat and drink tea, or even just water, and break the socially constructed barriers. 
 
The three-day-campaign will officially begin on July 20 and participants will be asked to upload selfies clicked with the family they’ve visited on a Facebook page, with the hashtag #SelfieWithGuest. 
 
People's organisations, activists, schools and colleges from different cities and towns have been called upon to coordinate, participate and encourage people to be a part of the campaign.
 
Hashmi says that the idea came to her mind as she herself has been perturbed by the kind of hatred and violence being propagated across the country. “One of the reasons why this happens is segregation. I have extensively worked in Gujarat, and there, there are areas and there are borders. On one side there are Hindus, and on the other side, there are Muslims. This ghettoisation of both the communities is happening everywhere,” she says.
 
Hashmi thinks that people have strong prejudices against the queer community, the Muslims, the Christians and Hindus – upper caste and lower caste. “So, we thought that we’ll try this. This is a very small experiment; not that it is going to change much, but we’ve given this call. After meeting these families, if there is even a small difference in their thinking, we have asked them to make a video in which they can talk about their experience, and send it to us,” she adds.
 
Photographs and videos of your interaction can be sent on WhatsApp on any of the following numbers: 9911016957 / 9811137421 / 8373940162 / 9979704474 / 9555999150 / 7503227553 / 8826768793 / 9818809018
 
For more information you can contact: Shabnam Hashmi - 9811807558, Abha Bhaiya - 8629863963, Leena – 9811137421 and Ovais - 9911016957/ 011 41670722
 
 

Comments

 

Other News

Health groups irked by the SC order on vaccine PSUs

Health groups have expressed their disappointment with a February 12 order of the supreme court, refusing to review or recall an earlier order disposing off a case against the mala fide suspension of the vaccine public sector units (PSUs) and government’s tendency to pamper private sector with public

Cut government stake below 50% in banks: Assocham

The Punjab National Bank`s fraudulent transactions worth Rs 11,300 crore should act as a strong trigger for the government for reducing its stake to less than 50 percent in the banks which should then be allowed to work on the lines of private sector lenders with a full sense of accountability to their sha

Tightrope walking meets poll dance

Budget 2018, forecast to be a “please all” budget, has come out as a “disappoint all” budget. The public is looking askance at a budget that gives with one hand but takes away with both, the Sensex has gone into a tailspin and the pink papers are issuing dire warnings.

Should public sector banks be privatised?

Should public sector banks be privatised?

PNB fraud: Why we need banking reforms

Billionaire jeweller Nirav Modi, whose properties are being searched after Punjab National Bank reported a massive fraud of Rs 11,000 crore, is a good reason why banking reforms

Gender based atrocities happens across the world: Dr Rashmi M Oza

“Gender based discrimination is worldwide and not alone in India. Offences against women are much more severe in cases of international trafficking, forced prostitution and pornography, women including migrant and refugee women face double barriers on virtue of their gender,"said Dr Rashmi M Oza

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter