Delhi tops list in number of years lost to air pollution to 6.3 years

The study estimates the Indo-Gangetic region for 42% of premature mortalities

GN Bureau | June 7, 2016


#Delhi   #air pollution   #pollution   #IITM   #PM 2.5   #ozone exposure   #mortality  


A recent study conducted by Indian institute of tropical meteorology (IITM), Pune shows that exposure to fine particulate matter in India reduces human life expectancy by about 3.4 ± 1.1 years. Delhi tops the list in the number of years lost to almost 6.3 ± 2.2 years due to exposure to particulate matter (PM) 2.5.

The study, titled 'Premature Mortalities due to PM 2.5 and Ozone Exposure in India', conducted in collaboration with the National Centre for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Colorado, quantifies, present-day premature mortalities associated with the exposure to near-surface PM 2.5 and ozone concentrations in India using a regional chemistry model. 
 
The study which is based on data compiled in the 2011 census, reports the following:

•    In 2011, about 5,70,000 premature deaths in India were caused by exposure to PM 2.5 and an additional 12,000 were caused by exposure to ozone.

•    The Indo-Gangetic region accounts for a large part (42%) of the estimated premature mortalities. This includes Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra. While UP recorded 15% of the country's deaths due to pollution, Maharashtra stood second with 10%. This is followed by West Bengal (9%) and Bihar (8%).

•    Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa and Rajasthan collectively account for 32% of the countrywide premature mortalities.

•    Mortalities due to exposure to harmful ozone pollution is 18% in UP which tops the list of total deaths. Bihar is (11%); West Bengal (9.5%) and Maharashtra (7%) come after that.
 
•    The economic cost of the estimated premature mortalities associated with PM 2.5 and ozone exposure together is about 640 billion USD in 2011, which is a factor of 10 higher than total expenditure on health by public and private expenditure.
 
ITM scientist Sachin Ghude, who was involved in the study, was quoted by The Times of India saying, "Although these results are in line with other global estimates, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Global Burden of Diseases (GBD), there's no physical way to tell who has actually been killed by air pollution."

Ghude added, "The methods used in this study rely on statistical algorithms to construct estimates about a population's response to pollution exposure using previous concrete observations on pollution and public health.

 

Comments

 

Other News

Finance ministry ropes in NBCC to build houses for officers

Department of Economic Affairs (DEA) and National Buildings Construction Corporation Ltd (NBCC) have signed an agreement for the construction of housing project for Indian Economic Service (IES) officers. For this, the urban development ministry has allotted 3,519 square metre of land on Dee

Aviation minister lays foundation of integrated office of aviation agencies

The foundation stone for the integrated office complex of director general of civil aviation (DGCA), bureau of civil aviation security (BCAS), airports economic regulatory authority of India (AERA), aircraft accident investigation bureau (AAIB) and airports authority of India (AAI) was laid by civil aviati

Civil society pays tribute to veteran journalist Neelabh Mishra

Civil society has paid rich tributes to Neelabh Mishra, veteran journalist and human rights activist, who died in Chennai Saturday after a prolonged battle with liver failure. The National Alliance of People`s Movements (NAPM) said it was deeply saddened to know of the untimely demise of its

All you need to know about the H-1B visa rules

It seems the process of procuring H-1B visas may get more difficult for the Indian IT companies with the new policy announcement by the US president Donald Trump. The new policy may hit the third party supplier base of the Indian IT firms in the US, the biggest users of H-1B visas. Moreover, now the H-1B m

Book Review: Letters to a Young Poet

Most of us would recall how sorely we needed a guide, a mentor, when we were in our twenties and starting out in a career, or in the deeper study of a branch of k

Can we handle our e-waste?

India is the fifth largest producer of e-waste in the world and has discarded approximately 18 lakh metric tonnes of e-waste in 2016, which is 12 percent of the global e-waste, according to a United Nations University study, ‘The Global E-Waste Monitor 2017’. In fact by 2020, India’s e-wa

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter