Exposure to tobacco, alcohol, unhealthy diet cause non communicable diseases

60 percent of all deaths in India are due to non-communicable diseases, according to WHO

GN Bureau | July 22, 2016


#alcohol   #tobacco   #Non communicable diseases   #unhealthy diet  

The four main non-communicable diseases (NCDs) – cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), chronic respiratory diseases, diabetes and cancers – are caused primarily by exposure to tobacco, harmful use of alcohol, unhealthy diet, and too little exercise, says Toshiko Kaneda and Reshma Naik, authors of a new report by the Population Reference Bureau.

The report titled ‘Addressing Non Communicable Disease Risk Factors Among Young People: Asia’s Window of Opportunity to Curb a Growing Epidemic’ says that these behaviours often begin in adolescence or young adulthood and set the stage for NCDs later in life.
 
This policy report comes just after World Health Organization (WHO) released a report emphasising the problems of NCDs.  According to WHO, Indians have a 26 percent chance of dying prematurely between the ages of 30 and 70 due to the four major NCDs. NCDs account for 60 percent of all deaths in India.
 
The WHO report highlights the need to intensify national action to meet the global targets governments have agreed to protect people from heart disease, cancers, diabetes, and lung diseases. Globally, these four NCDs represent the largest cause of death in people aged less than 70 years, posing a major threat to sustainable development. 
 
Some of the key suggestions in the Population Reference Bureau report are:
 
  • Strengthening regulations of the food industry like setting maximum salt, sugar or saturated fat content in food products and food labelling and taxes on soda.   
  • The food processing industry accounts for about 50-60 percent of the sugar, salt and fats consumed, making it challenging to encourage healthy diets among young people. 
  • Seven of every 10 boys and girls in the 13-15 year age group in India get too little exercise, meaning less than 60 minutes per day.  More than one in five of them are overweight or obese, placing them at a high risk of developing NCDs.
  • Among 13- to 15-year-old secondary school students in India, 19 percent of boys and 8 percent of girls have used a tobacco product in the past month. Most of this consumption is of non-commercially produced cigarettes—tobacco products like bidi, an inexpensive hand-rolled cigarette made of unprocessed tobacco wrapped in leaves.
 

Comments

 

Other News

The rot at the top

CBI is supposed to be the last resort to catch the corrupt after all other options have not yielded the desired result. But, who will now tackle corruption now that two of the former top officials of the premier investigating agency are themselves facing charges.   India is s

Demonetisation is short-term challenges for long-term gains: Usha Ananthasubramanian

Post demonetisation, what are the challenges faced by banks? Post demonetisation, the major challenges are retention of CASA [current account, savings account] deposits, deployment of these funds, impact of spurt/decline in low-cost deposits on MCLR [marginal cost of fund

Universal Basic Income: The way forward

9.44 The irresistible force of even as powerful an idea as UBI will run into the immovable object of a resistant, pesky reality. So, what is the way forward, always remembering that the yardstick for assessment is not whether UBI can be perfect or faultless but only whether it can impr

Should action be taken against hospitals which have hiked the heart surgery cost?

Should action be taken against hospitals which have hiked the heart surgery cost?

ONGC office wins sustainable building design award

 The state-of-the-art corporate office of oil and natural gas corporation (ONGC), Pandit Deen Dayal Uphadhayay Urja Bhawan,  in New Delhi has won leadership in energy and environmental design (LEED) India ‘platinum’ award by US green building council (USGBC), the highest recognition f

Video

चुनावी माहौल में वाराणसी के अस्सी घाट से एक रिपोर्ट
Digital Transformation Summit

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter