Here's how poll bound Punjab performs in primary education

Majority of schools had leaking roofs, broken doors and windows and damped walls

GN Bureau | October 6, 2016


#Punjab   #Right to Education   #RTE   #New Education Policy   #Education  
Picture for representational purpose only
Picture for representational purpose only

Punjab, set for the assembly polls in 2017, presents a dismal picture of elementary education in its rural belt. A NITI Aayog sponsored study conducted by Guru Arjan Dev Institute of Development Studies highlights the following points:

 

  • Majority of rural schools were found without proper furniture for students. Only 6.96 percent schools had benches and 68.74 percent had desks for  their  children.

 

  • Many schools were without toilets, well-equipped, libraries, kitchen for mid-day meals, playgrounds.

 

  • 15.82 percent schools had only two class rooms for running classes up to class 5.

 

  • Apparently, these  schools manage with conducting combined classes or teach in open spaces even in extreme weather conditions.

 

  • 83.32 percent school buildings were quite old and were in dilapidated conditions and needed immediate repairs and renovations.

 

  • Even the newly built schools were found in bad shape due to lack of annual maintenance funds/grants.

 

  • Majority of schools had leaking roofs, broken doors and windows and damped walls.

 

  • Some schools were found to be managed by a single teacher.

 

  • Some schools did not have funds for purchasing benches, blackboards, chairs, desks etc. and to pay even electricity bills. There is no annual maintenance grant for buildings.

 

  • Some of the schools did not want to run mid-day meal scheme due to non-availability/delay of funds, lack of utensils, non-availability/shortage of food grains, lack of cooking utensils, lack of drums, bins etc.

 

  • Only 2.95 percent and 2.79 percent schools had Science and Computer labs, respectively.

 

  • Academic performance was also shocking. Average marks obtained by students up to class 5 (primary level) was merely 31 percent. Nearly one-fourth of the students were not able to open up their score/ accounts, that is, got zero marks.

 

  • In upper primary classes (classes 6 to 8), none of the students  got A, B or C Grades in the surprise test just before the final examinations. About 97 percent students received less than 35 percent marks.


See full report here

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