Indians most affected by global internet policies: Aruna Sundararajan

Experts said that there is a need to build trust frameworks

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Praggya Guptaa | November 24, 2017 | New Delhi


#Aruna Sundararajan   #Nasscom   #UN   #internet policies   #Cyber security  


 People in India are most affected by global internet policies, said secretary, department of telecommunications, Aruna Sundararajan.

Flagging the challenges of national governance, Sundararajan said on social media India has the largest number of users. 
 
 “A large number of people in India sign up for many products and services online.  Even when they have given the consent, they are not informed what they have given consent for. Even the literate are not adequately informed about vulnerabilities while giving the consent. I think increasingly, every country does its best to safeguard its citizen. This is a dynamic area where regulatory regime works in process,” said Sundarajan during a panel discussion on reinforcing trust in cyberspace: international standardization and capacity building effort in the 5th global conference on CyberSpace 2017. 
 
Nasscom president R Chandrashekhar said that countries are trying to control physical assets of the Internet, which is a doomed approach.  
“Physical control really means nothing, and then there is a question of liability. Who is liable if something happens? How to establish a chain of liability especially when you have all these technologies? What is the role of a state when this thing happens? So it is difficult to envisage the real solution to these problems, unless there is a far higher degree of international cooperation,” Chandrashekhar added.
 
Peter Major, vice chairman, United Nations Commission on Science and Technology for Development emphasized that education is the key. 
Veni Markovski, vice president, ICANN said that to avoid the deep digital divide, there is a need for education stakeholders like policy makers, decision makers, and educating teacher. 
 
The panel summarised with a suggestion to focus on security which is imperative for the digital society. 
 
The experts said that there is a need to build trust frameworks, extensive focus on capacity building, developing cooperative and collaborative network between states, shared information technologies and promoting a global culture of cybersecurity at the social development level of each country will go the way for realizing asafe, secure cyber states and sustainable development.
 

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