Nathu La opens for Kailash pilgrims and new frontier of Sino-Indian friendship

Nathu La means mountain pass with listening ears was closed after 1962 war and this route is more comfortable for pilgrims

GN Bureau | June 22, 2015


#nathu la   #india   #china   #kailash mansarovar   #pilgrims  

Another door has opened to China and it has people connect. After over half-a-century of closure as consequence of the 1962 Sino-India war, Nathu La pass opened on Monday for the first batch of Indian pilgrims on Kailash Mansarovar Yatra.  Chinese Ambassador to India Le Yucheng received the pilgrims in Tibet.

Yucheng received 39 Indian pilgrims, besides BJP MP Tarun Vijay and his wife in the morning. This batch will complete Manasarovar Parikrama (circumambulation) on June 27 and 'Kailash Parikrama', 16,600 feet above sea level, on June 28 before returning to the Indian side on July 3.

The new route through the Himalayan pass will facilitate more comfortable travel for the Indian pilgrims, especially the elderly, by buses compared to the existing route via Lipulekh Pass in Uttarakhand. The journey will be mainly covered through bus with only a little of trekking.

Nathu La, which means "Mountain pass with listening ears", was closed after 1962 war. The area had witnessed week-long skirmishes between the Indian and Chinese Army. After remaining closed for all activities, the pass was opened as a trading junction in 2006. Traders from both sides gathered in the No-Man's Land and sold their items, mostly goat and sheep skin, raw silk, china clay, butter, common salt, cycles, tea and cigarette.

Kailash Mansarovar is believed to be the seat of Hindu god Shiva. Pilgrims have to travel to high altitudes through inhospitable and rugged terrain. Hundreds go on the pilgrimage every year, with a part of the journey overseen by Chinese authorities.

Meanwhile, first batch of 58 Indian pilgrims undertaking the Kailash Mansarovar yatra on Saturday crossed over to the Tibetan Autonomous Region of China through Lipulekh pass, situated at 17,500 feet on the existing route.

Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) jawans helped the pilgrims at Nabhidhank camp, where they reached last evening after spending two days at Gunji camp.

The pilgrims crossed over to Chinese territory early in the morning as roads become slippery due to melting of snow after temperature increases after sun rises.

During their stay, they will perform 'Parikrama' (circumambulation) of holy mountain, Kailash and take a dip in holy lake, Mansarovar.

According to ITBP sources, the second batch of pilgrims has reached Bundi camp. "The second batch of 54 pilgrims will reach Gunji camp tomorrow on the occasion of International Yoga Day (IYD). They will also participate in performing yoga with ITBP jawans at 10,370 feet high to mark the IYD in the country," said ITBP officers.

Comments

 

Other News

Look who’s talking ethics in Karnataka?

 Just after the UP assembly election in 1996, I was among the scores of reporters waiting at Kalyan Singh’s residence, waiting to get the first inkling of the future course of the BJP. The party had secured the maximum seats – 174 out of 425 seats – but was short of the majority mark

Company secretaries are gatekeepers of corporate governance: SEBI Chairman

“Company Secretaries, once known as secretaries to the board and management, have transformed themselves into key managerial and governance professionals. Today they are recognised for their importance on corporate landscape and have become gatekeepers of corporate governance,” said Ajay Tyagi,

Will there be light at the end of the tunnel?

Any good news which promises to bring about qualitative improvement in the lives of people, especially in rural India, is always welcome. It was heartening indeed to learn that every single village in the country now has access to electricity, as announced by the prime minister on April 29. This is most ce

A dry run in Bundelkhand

The paved road, the few concrete houses and men on motorcycles – these are deceptive signs of development in Madralalpur village. Only a couple of weeks ago, Babu, a 47-year-old distressed farmer, had hanged himself from a babool tree. Villagers were gathered at his house as his wife, mother, sister-

Our jobs, their jobs

Statistics has come a long way from the time when British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli observed: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” Statistics is now an accredited branch of applied mathematics; statistical methods are routinely used to prove or disprove the

Why hasty ordinance on rape of minors needs gender balance

Of all offences, it’s the crime of rape that fires public sentiment the most, eliciting an outrage that exceeds the seemingly worst felony of all – murder too. It has probably more to do with the offence and associated gory details staying, even being replayed ruthlessly, in memory with continu

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter