People tell govt: Wada Na Todo

A mid-term appraisal of the 11th five-year plan is underway in New Delhi to give people a voice in plan and policy formulations

trithesh

Trithesh Nandan | February 5, 2010



For the first time in country, an appraisal of the five-year plan is being carried by the civil society which gives voice to common man's concerns in formulation of plan and policies that govern them.

"In a democracy, people are central to governance and they should play an active role in evaluating the objectives and targets set in the five-year plan", asserts Suman Dasgupta, programme coordinator of Wada Na Todo Abhiyan (WNTA), which is has initiated the process.

The first day of the appraisal activity on Thursday say people from different parts of the country converging in New Delhi to voice their views on government’s plan in the “mid-term appraisal" of the 11th five-year plan.

Talking about the need to bring people into the plan and policy process, Amitabh Behar, convenor of WNTA, told Governance Now that the aim was to make people aware of government's accountability. What are the implications of five-year plan for the aam admi? How much space has been given to them? How well the 11th five-year plan has fared midway? These were the questions that exercised Behar and his colleagues and motivated them to arrange such an unique experiment.

The participants measured up to the expectations. A mother of 10-year-old boy fired the first volley: "What is the point in sending my son to school if he cannot write properly and get a job when he grows up?" Apparently, she was questioning the quality of education and its relevance in providing livelihood.

There were several questions universalisation of basic education, health facilities and rural employment guarantee programme. Behar commented: “WNTA has come forward to assist the review process by providing an assessment of the performance of the ongoing plan from people’s perspective.”

For the last six decades, the five-year plan has played an important role in country’s development. The 11th five-year plan which is currently underway focuses on “inclusive growth.” It is for the first time in the history of planning in India that a massive appraisal process is being experimented. So far, the assessments were held in ten states. In addition, group discussions were held in 100 villages. Basic services such as health, education, drinking water, sanitation and implementation of related government programmes and schemes figured prominently in such exercises.

The planning commission is aware of its shortcomings. In the approach to the 11th five-year plan, the planning commission said “large parts of our population are still to experience a decisive improvement in their standard of living.....,far too many of our people still lack the basic requirements for a decent living.”

The second day seminar on Friday would focus on issues relating to dalits, adivasis, women and children, minorities and the differently-abled.  

WNTA has prepared the mid-term appraisal plan with the help of 3,750 civil society and cummunity-based organisations across 29 states and union territories.

Comments

 

Other News

Mumbai civil body refutes allegations of scam in tenement scheme

The BrihanMumbai municipal corporation (BMC) has rejected the Congress accusations of financial irregularities worth Rs 8,000 crore—9,000 croe in awarding contracts for getting project-affected people (PAP) tenements on private land.    BMC has said that it implements vital p

Sedition law: Can it have a place in democracy?

Does the concept of sedition have a place in modern democracies? This question became more relevant when the apex court recently put the country`s colonial-era sedition law on abeyance stating that there is a “requirement to balance… security interests and integrity of the State… and th

Not just another Manto anthology

The Collected Stories of Saadat Hasan Manto: Volume 1: Bombay and Poona Translated by Nasreen Rehman Aleph Book Company, 548 pages, Rs 999 There are writers, there are writers’ writers, and then there are readers’ writers. Saadat Hasan Mant

These tribal women may be illiterate but are successful entrepreneurs

Meet Promila Krishna, 39, Lalita Nayak, 40, Parbati Gadba, 42, Sanadei Dhuruwa, 39, and Nabita Barika, 41, of Kundra block in Odisha’s Koraput district. Except for Promila who is a matriculate, others haven’t attended school beyond the elementary level. However, while introducing themselves to

Women in workforce: Despite policy support, why it is declining

Michelle Obama once said, “No country can ever truly flourish if it stifles the potential of its women and deprives itself of the contributions of half of its citizens.” That should be so obvious, but it is not, and countries keep depriving themselves of the contributions of half of their popul

Chintan Shivir 2022: Will Congress regain its lost mojo?

The Congress is scheduled to hold a Chintan Shivir (meaning, ‘introspection camp’) from May 13th to 15th in Udaipur and it has identified six specific areas for introspection. These are 1. Political 2. Social Justice and Empowerment 3. Economy 4. Organization 5. Farmers and Agriculture and 6. Y

Visionary Talk: Arvind Sawant, Member of Parliament with Kailashnath Adhikari, MD, Governance Now


Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter