On way to decarbonised world

Despite the caveats, the climate change agreement has been broadly welcomed as a historic first step towards a decarbonised economy. Here are five points in the 31-page document

GN Bureau | December 14, 2015




Temperature and long-term goal
The deal calls for nations to work toward capping global temperature increases since pre-industrial times to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). The text acknowledges the need to strive for 1.5 degrees, a key demand of the countries most vulnerable to warming, including island states imperiled by rising seas. Nations will reduce emissions as soon as possible to “achieve a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks” like forests that absorb greenhouse gases.

Revision and reduction
To encourage more ambitious efforts, countries will need to update their current pollution-reduction pledges by 2020 and then do so every five years. That’s because plans submitted so far by 186 nations would guarantee a temperature cap of 2.7 degrees at best. Nations will periodically analyze collective progress toward achieving the goal of the Paris agreement. The first assessment, or “global stocktake,” will take place in 2023.

Sustainable development
The agreement establishes a “mechanism to contribute to the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions and support sustainable development” and paves the way for voluntary cooperation between countries in meeting their pollution goals. Detailed rules for the market mechanism will be established at a later date.

Transparency
Governments agreed to set up a framework for monitoring, measuring and verifying emissions reductions. This will promote transparency on who is doing what and give those seeking to bring pressure on underperformers information to fuel their arguments. Developing countries were given some flexibility on different provisions, including on the scope, frequency and level of detail of reporting. Small island states and the least developed countries have lower requirements.

Paying for the deal
The deal obliges developed nations to help developing countries pay for reducing pollution and adapting to the impacts of climate change. Negotiators agreed to establish by 2025 a new target to scale up climate finance. The next goal will be to increase the $100 billion a year that they had previously agreed to provide by 2020. The text says developing nations in a position to do so “are encouraged to provide or continue to provide such support voluntarily.”

http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2015/cop21/eng/l09r01.pdf

Comments

 

Other News

70 words that define India, why Doklam stand-off won’t lead to a war, and more

As India celebrates 70 years of freedom, Governance Now looks back and picks 70 words – or phrases, buzzwords, slogans, events – that best define this ancient nation and young democracy. Here, you will find much to be proud of, much tinged with pangs of nostalgia. Then there are entries that

A dose of PPP in healthcare is what the doctor recommends

Dr Kenneth E Thorpe, a professor of health policy and management at Emory University in the US and also the executive director of Partnership to Fight Chronic Diseases (PFCD), says that the government alone cannot do everything. “They don’t have the resources and capacity. So we have to fin

EESL signs MoU with oil companies for energy saving appliances

Energy Efficiency Services Limited (EESL), a joint venture company of PSUs of ministry of power, signed an agreement with oil marketing companies (OMCs) of ministry of petroleum and natural gas for distribution of energy efficient appliances under the flagship Unnat Jeevan by Affordable LEDs and applianc

Jammu airport’s upgraded terminal building inaugurated

Union minister for civil aviation, P Ashok Gajapathi Raju inaugurated the upgraded passenger terminal building of Jammu airport.   Notably, Jammu airport belongs to the Indian Air Force, and airports authority of India (AAI) maintains a civil enclave for civil aircraft operat

Election Commission shows it has spine

The election commission has become increasingly assertive in the past few months, showing its mettle in times of electoral challenges.   Weeks after rooting from EVMs and just days after the poll panel declared votes cast by two rebel Congress legislators in the Rajya Sabha e

Is Amit Shah`s blueprint for 350-plus seats in 2019 Lok Sabha elections achievable?

Is Amit Shah`s blueprint for 350-plus seats in 2019 Lok Sabha elections achievable?



Video

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter