Being anti-national

binay-kumar-sinha

Binay Kumar Sinha | April 6, 2016


#nationalism   #supreme court   #sedition   #law   #human rights   #jnu row   #JNU   #gandhi   #kanhaiya kumar   #jawaharlal nehru university  

Of late, we’ve been hearing a lot about the charges of sedition, anti-nationalism, anti-democratic, being levelled against the students of JNU commemorating Afzal Guru and Yakub Memon. The question is whether the action of students eulogizing Afzal Guru and others whose actions are inimical to the sovereignty and integrity of the nation is justified.  

Not merely that, if at all this is how we act against the interests of our own  nation, how far will it be justifiable on the grounds of nationalism, patriotism we swear by too often to prove our loyalty to  it. Does it not prove that we have become adept in the art of being double-tongued as and when it suits us? These are some questions which arise naturally in our mind to know whether we have not gone astray from the chosen track of nationalism. It is just because of this fact that now-a-days in view of the so-called freedom of speech and expression, nationalism as a word has lost its real significance.

As a matter of fact, the way we are discussing our day to day problems, we have not been able to handle these meticulously with maturity of vision and far-sightedness. For instance, whether meddling in JNU campus in view of the unrest, created by students being arrested by the police for their anti-national views, is right or wrong is a question to be answered by one and all without showing partisan views and feelings. It goes without saying that we have been polarising ourselves day by day by waging a relentless war against the odds and obstacles created by the mushroom growth of parties and sects resulting too often in the logjam of parliament. It appears as if as individuals we are divided in sects of diverse kinds hardly to compromise with others’ views as if disagreeing with other’s views is the only hallmark of our democratic culture. Tolerance, good temper and sympathy do no longer exist in our party –politics thriving on the vicious circle of caste, creed, and jingoism. Freedom of speech has as such become a license for vilification in the political arena. This is why irrespective of the connotations of a speech given by someone we start politicising it immediately, making the matters worse.

Overall, the background of the events occurring in a country as vast as India is not very encouraging for the growth of democratic temper. Problems like student unrest, reservation of seats in civil services, the feeling of intolerance arising from different quarters are endemic in nature in our country although the problems we are facing are blessings in disguise for us. We have yet to develop the knack of tackling them with precision and insight. Instead of using the force without considering the autonomy of institutions of higher education in JNU or anywhere, cool analysis of problems is a must. Nationalism or the spirit of selfless service inducing us to make sacrifices for our nation shows a declining trend today as a result of our immature thinking.

Above all, what we need at this juncture is the realisation of the feeling of belonging to a nation which is our motherland and the duty of keeping it safe and sound in its real health and spirit. We must challenge the anti-national elements who are ready to keep it divided rather than united. It is our deed which speaks for or against us .We must try to build a strong national character to withstand the hostile forces working against the sovereignty of our country.

It would, therefore, be our bounden duty to consider the value of our constitution above all which is a written one and the way it has been dealt with by our experts and jurists is more than enough in itself to guide us  for the spirit of nationalism. The sovereignty and security of our country should be our first and foremost concern. Otherwise the day will not too far to find it divided into many pieces.

 

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