Stories you must read over the weekend

We replug a list of four stories from our latest issue that you should not miss this weekend

GN Bureau | February 17, 2017


#child sex ratio   #Jharkhand   #weekend stories   #WHO   #Aadhaar  
Weekend stories
Weekend stories

 
Tribals in the land of the legendary Birsa Munda in Jharkhand are fighting against the amendments of the Chotanagpur Tenancy Act (CNTA) and Santhal Pargana Tenancy Act (SPTA). These were hastily changed by the BJP government – first by an ordinance in June, and then, amendments in November – to remove the restrictions on sale of adivasi land for commercial purposes. 
 
 
India’s child sex ratio (CSR), the primary indicator of missing girls in India, is the lowest since independence at 918 girls per 1,000 boys (census 2011). The CSR in India declined from 945 in 1991 to 927 in 2001. In India, medical practitioners have played a major role in the elimination of girls. Interviews with seven gynaecologists on sex selective abortions revealed their opinion on sex determination, their patients’ perceptions regarding the Pre-Conception and Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques (PCPNDT) Act 1994 and its implementation. 
 
 
Ever since the unique identity number, or Aadhaar, was introduced in India, it has carefully avoided spelling out its status – whether it is mandatory or not. The official stance, even after a change in government, remains that Aadhaar is ‘essential’ to avail specific services but it is voluntary on the citizen to apply for it or not. The long-awaited law, passed last year, has also avoided the word ‘mandatory’, even as the supreme court in a series of verdicts has maintained it cannot be mandatory. 
 
 
The governing body of the UN’s health agency that sets the agenda of work on global health met late January. In its 140th session, the executive board (EB) of the World Health Organisation (WHO) had much to discuss and agree upon, including the job of narrowing a long list down to three candidates who would compete to become the next director-general (DG) of the WHO.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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