Indians want more military force in Kashmir: Pew

Few say India should use less force or even the same amount as it is using now

GN Bureau | November 17, 2017


#Pew Research Centre   #Reports   #Governance   #Narendra Modi   #Kashmir   #Defence  

When it comes to dealing with the disputed border regions of Jammu and Kashmir, the Indian public favours an aggressive stance, said the Pew Research Center, a US based think-tank.

A 63% majority believes the government should be using more military force. Few say India should use less force or even the same amount as it is using now, it said.

While Indians have consistently given Pakistan negative ratings in Pew Research Center surveys, the extent of their disapproval has intensified in 2017. More than six-in-ten (64%) in India have a very unfavorable view of Pakistan today, up from 55% last year.

Read: Kashmir’s Bloody Money Trail

Disdain for Pakistan cuts across party lines – BJP and Congress party supporters express similar levels of negativity for India’s longtime foreign rival (70% vs. 63% very unfavorable), said the report “Three Years In, Modi Remains Very Popular”.

However, those living in southern India, far from the India-Pakistan border, are decidedly less negative about Pakistan. Only 36% of those living in the south express a very unfavorable opinion of Pakistan, compared with 68% in the east, 69% in the north and 77% in the west. And in southern India 30% have a favorable view of Pakistan, versus just 6% in the north and east and 3% in the west.

The report said that roughly two-thirds (66%) of Indians believe ISIS poses a major threat to their country, easily outstripping concern about all other international issues tested. Indian concerns about the Islamic militant group are up 14 percentage points since 2016. During the survey fielding period this spring, ISIS carried out its first attack in India, injuring 10 train passengers in Madhya Pradesh.

About half of Indians feel very threatened by global climate change, while slightly fewer name China’s power and influence and cyberattacks from other countries as major threats. About a third believe the large number of refugees leaving countries such as Iraq and Syria and the condition of the global economy are large concerns.

Also read: Interlocutor’s talks with Kashmir groups break the ice – but that’s about it

 

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