Metro polls: Aspirational Delhi v/s harassed aam aadmi

Stable government or an honest system is the dilemma of Delhi

shishir

Shishir Tripathi | February 5, 2015 | New Delhi



Aam aadmi in the metro is debating. It is no more an oblivious crowd with earphones-raging out loud music-plugged in the ears. They are discussing politics, especially Delhi elections, Narendra Modi and Arvind Kejriwal.

The core theme of the debate: “What is your priority, is it a stable government or an honest system in place.”

READ: Unconventional leaders define Delhi assembly polls

R S Rauthan, a Mehrauli resident feels that BJP would provide a stable government.”I feel that for educated people stable government is an utmost priority. In spite of all good intentions, AAP will not be able to do the same. And to bring any significant change you need a stable government”, says, Rauthan.

But it seems to be the case for “educated” and upper class. For those belonging to the lower income group, AAP gives them an assurance. Surprisingly, they value this aam assurance more than anything.

Sunny Yadav, who works in Courier Company says, “a lot of us feel that the AAP government was good. In that short span of time we could live comfortably. To get our work done we were not required to pay any bribe to any government official.”

When economist Kaushik Basu said that “harassment bribe” should be legalised, he seemingly was totally ignorant about how much it matters in shaping the political preference.

Mateen, an auto rickshaw driver, living in Salempur says, “One cannot imagine what kind of harassment we have to face by police and other government officials. We have to regularly pay bribes to them. And because of that we sometime overcharge the passengers. However In those 49 days we felt that we were also equal. We were never harassed and in turn we never overcharged any commuter.”

Kiran, an official with a government telecom company says, “Last time we voted for BJP. But AAP came to power and in spite of many constraints, they did well. This time I wish to vote AAP.

Kejriwal’s 49-day government rule seems to be still resonating and people want to give him another shot.

But writing off the BJP will be a big mistake. Their supporters are silent but they are certain. J K Gandhi an old time ‘jan sangh’ supporter says, “we are not making noise but let me tell you, there are so many people who believe in Modi’s leadership. They will vote for him.”

Before Gandhi could say more, Amit, a B.Com student from Kirori Mal College says, “many of my friends are smitten by Modi’s personality. He is decisive and will surely bring India on world stage.”

Our metro journey ends with Amit’s assertion. But to conclude an outcome of the Delhi elections and the future of the national capital is another journey.

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