Lok Sabha passes the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill

Legislation not against any minority, but against illegal immigrants: : Home minister

GN Bureau | December 10, 2019


#Pakistan   #home ministry   #parliament   #Amit Shah   #Narendra Modi   #Citizenship Amendment bill   #Bangladesh   #Afghanistan  
Home minister Amit Shah leading the discussion on the Citizenship Amendment Bill in the Lok Sabha on Monday
Home minister Amit Shah leading the discussion on the Citizenship Amendment Bill in the Lok Sabha on Monday

After a day-long debate which often turned acrimonious, the Lok Sabha has passed the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill 2019, seeking to provide citizenship to non-Muslims from three neighbouring countries who have migrated to India.
 
Prime minister Narendra Modi said he was “delighted” after the house voted on the bill a little after midnight Monday.

The Bill seeks to grant Indian citizenship to persons belonging to Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist, Jain, Parsi and Christian communities who have migrated to India after facing persecution on grounds of religion in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Bangladesh, if they fulfil conditions for grant of citizenship.

During the debate, the opposition alleged that the bill was regressive. Trinamul Congress termed the bill unconstitutional and divisive. CPM also claimed it was aimed to establish racial supremacy in India. Asaduddin Owaisi of the All India Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen even torn a copy of the bill, saying that this government hated Muslims. The bill was passed with 311 members in favour and 80 against.

Introducing the bill, home minister Amit Shah said that while nowhere does this bill target India’s minority community, illegal immigrants would not be allowed to stay in the country at any cost.

Replying to the debate, he said that misconceptions were being spread that the bill was against any particular community, but this is a humanitarian step to grant citizenship to those who suffered for the last 70 years. He said that failure of the Nehru-Liaqat pact of 1950 is also one of the reasons of bringing about this bill. He further said that it was Congress which accepted the partition of India on religious ground and therefore the need for the bill was necessitated.

Manish Tewari of the Congress, however, said that the ‘two-nation theory’ which led to the partition had its foundations in the ideology of V.D. Savarkar. The Congress, moreover, did not accept the religious basis of the partition and India chose to remain a secular country.

The home minister asked the members to distinguish between the genuine refuges and the intruders, and added that the Narendra Modi government is committed to security and all equal rights to all and there would be no discrimination based on the religion.

As the bill had triggered protests in the Northeast, Shah clarified that the provisions of the amendments to the Act would not apply to the tribal area of Assam, Meghalaya, Mizoram or Tripura as included in the Sixth Schedule to the Constitution and the area covered under ‘The Inner Line’ notified under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation, 1873.

The bill also seeks to amend the Third Schedule to the Act to make applicants belonging to the said communities from the three countries eligible for citizenship by naturalisation if they can establish their residency in India for five years instead of the existing eleven years. Making an important announcement, Shah said that Manipur would be brought under the Inner Line Permit (ILP) regime and with that the problems of all the Northeastern states would be taken care of. He said, all the apprehensions of the Northeastern states and that of Sikkim were addressed in the bill and that is the reason they are supporting this bill.

Shah claimed there was no political agenda behind the bill but it was only a Constitutional process to give citizenship to those who were denied basic civil rights for the last 70 years. He cited the provisions from Constitutions of Afghanistan, Pakistan and Bangladesh where they provide for a specific state religion. In this scenario, Shah stated that these countries have had a history of persecution of religious minorities, namely, Hindus, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains, Parsis and Christians. Some of them also have fears about such persecution in their day-to-day life where right to practise, profess and propagate their religion has been obstructed and restricted. Many such persons have fled to India to seek shelter and continued to stay in India even if their travel documents have expired or they have incomplete or no documents.

Reassuring such persons against any harassment, Shah said that a person who makes an application for citizenship would not be disqualified for making the application on the ground that a proceeding is pending against him/her and the application would not be rejected on that ground, if he is otherwise found qualified for grant of citizenship. Further, the person who makes an application for citizenship would not be deprived of his/her rights and privileges to which he/she was entitled on the date of receipt of his application.

The home minister said that this bill contains provisions to grant citizenship to such refugees on reasonable grounds, which in no way go against any provision under the Constitution of India and does not violate Article 14. He also reassured that no provision of Article 371 would be violated by this bill. The linguistic, cultural and social identity of the people of the Northeast would be preserved and this bill contains the solution to the problems of the people of these states, as the provisions of the amendment have been incorporated after marathon deliberations with various stakeholders from the Northeast for last one month. The issue should be seen as a humanitarian one, beyond political ideologies.

Talking about the Right to Equality, Shah said that Article 14 allows reasonable qualifications to its provisions and there have been instances in the past when refugees facing persecution in other countries have been granted Indian citizenship. Giving example of refugees coming from Bangladesh in 1971, he said that the government of that time gave citizenship to these refugees. The home minister said that the inflow of refugees have not stopped after that. Refugees from Uganda were also given citizenship and same steps were taken during Sri Lankan crisis and after the signing of the Assam Accord in 1985. These decisions were based on reasonable qualifications to Article 14, he added.

Talking about another amendment to the Act, Shah said the bill seeks to amend section 7D so as to empower the central government to cancel registration as Overseas Citizen of India Cardholder, after providing a reasonable opportunity of being heard, in case of violation of any provisions of the Citizenship Act or any other law for the time being in force.

The home minister said that there is no merit in the questions raised by members on the competency of Parliament to discuss this bill on the ground that it is against the basic structure and ethos of the Constitution. “I want to assure the nation that this bill is not against any provision of the Constitution of India,” he said.

Comments

 

Other News

In times of Corona, think twice before forwarding soc media posts

Amid exceptional circumstances of COVID-19 outbreak and the 21-day nationwide lockdown, authorities are trying to discourage spread of rumours and misinformation through social media. Maharashtra Cyber Police came out with an advisory for WhatsApp users and admins during the COVID-19, even

Mumbai hospitals shut as more and more healthcare workers test positive

Maharashtra has emerged the epicentre of the Novel Coronavirus outbreak in the country with Mumbai reporting the highest number of cases in the state. With more and more healthcare providers getting infected, hospitals are becoming the hotbeds of virus perpetuation. On Monday Wockhardt hosp

As nation lighted lamps, power grid delivered

As Indians switched off lights in homes and lighted lamps and candles Sunday night following prime minister Narendra Modi’s appeal as a gesture of solidarity in the fight against COVID-19, the power grid held up well despite the sudden drop in demand. In a short video message on Friday

3 out of 4 Covid-19 patients in 21-60 yrs age group

Contrary to the perception that the elderly are more at risk from Covid-19, in India as many as 41.88% of corona positive cases are between 21 to 40 years of age. Also, 32.82% positive cases are between 41 to 60 years, followed by 16.69% cases above the age of 60 years and 8.61% coronavirus positive cases

Why everyone should wear mask

In view of the increasing number of COVID -19 cases in the country, the ministry of health and family welfare (MoHFW) has now advised that everyone must voluntarily wear a mask and especially those living in densely populated areas.   Not just as a matter of maintaining personal hygiene

Fighting Covid-19, India has realized its collective strength: PM

In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic, people of India have realized their collective strength, prime minister Narendra Modi said in a short video message Friday morning. He also urged people to light lamps Sunday night as a gesture of this collectivity. “Today marks nine days of the na



Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter