Modi quotes Rajiv, Somnath; should’ve also quoted Sushma, Jaitley

BJP – as well as Congress – has only ad-hoc views on parliament disruptions

GN Bureau | March 3, 2016


#Sushma Swaraj   #Somnath Chatterjee   #Rajiv Gandhi   #Sonia Gandhi   #Congress   #BJP   #Narendra Modi   #Arun Jaitley  


Prime minister Narendra Modi, replying to the debate after the president’s address, once again called on the opposition to cooperate in pushing ahead parliamentary business and pending legislations. Modi quoted former prime minister Rajiv Gandhi and former Lok Sabha speaker Somnath Chatterjee at length to underline his point: that parliament must be allowed to function even as all debates and discussions are welcome on the floor.

A skilled rhetorician first spoke of the need to let parliament function – and then slyly added, “This is not an advice from Narendra Modi, but from former prime minister Rajiv Gandhi” – much to the discomfort of Congress chief Sonia Gandhi sitting across him.

Modi, of course, would not have quoted his own colleagues, Sushma Swaraj and Arun Jaitley, who as leaders of opposition in the two houses during the UPA years, ensured parliament remained paralytic for record periods.

Just to recall, here are two quotes representative of the BJP argument:

Sushma Swaraj, on September 7, 2012: “Not allowing parliament to function is a form of democracy like any other form…”

Arun Jaitley, on January 30, 2011: “Parliament’s job is to conduct discussions. But many a time, parliament is used to ignore issues and in such situations, obstruction of parliament is in the favour of democracy. Therefore parliamentary obstruction is not undemocratic.”

Now, this is not to argue that Swaraj and Jaitley were indeed right back then. However, as long as Modi quotes non-BJP leaders and does not offer a word of regret over BJP leaders’ earlier remarks and behaviour, there can be little hope for bipartisan cooperation. With a historic majority under his belt, Modi has an opportunity to rise above the partisan lines and set a new precedent of government-opposition cooperation.

Possibly in a first step in that direction, Modi repeatedly underlined that the long-pending GST bill was, after all, “your” (that is, UPA’s) bill. Possibly as a grudging handshake offer, Modi has given up on the ordinance route that he relentlessly used in the first year of his government.
 

Comments

 

Other News

The Manali Trance: Economics of Abandoning Caution in the Time of Coronavirus

The brutal second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in India has left a significant death toll in its wake. Health experts advise that the imminent third wave can be delayed by following simple measures like wearing a mask and engaging in social distancing. However, near the end of the second wave, we witnesse

Govt considers fixing driving hrs of commercial vehicles

Union Minister of Road Transport and Highways Nitin Gadkari has emphasised deciding driving hours for truck drivers of commercial vehicles, similar to pilots, to reduce fatigue-induced road accidents. In a Na

Telecom department simplifies KYC processes for mobile users

In a step towards Telecom Reforms which aim to provide internet and tele connectivity for the marginalised section, the Department of Telecommunications, Ministry of Communica

Mumbai think tank calls for climate action

Raising concerns over rising seawater levels and climate change, Mumbai First, a 25-year-old public-private partnership policy think tank, has written letters to Maharashtra chief minister Uddhav Thackeray, minister for environment and climate change, tourism and protocol, Aditya Thackeray and Mumbai munic

Creation of ‘good bank’ as important as ‘bad bank’ for NPA management

After the recent announcement of the government guarantee for Security Receipts (SRs) to be issued by a public sector-owned National Asset Reconstruction Company Ltd (NARCL), there is a surge of interest around this desi version of a super bad bank. The entity will acquire around ₹2 trillion bad debts fr

V shape recovery an exaggeration: Gurcharan Das

The notion of a V-shape economic recovery is an exaggeration, and the informal economy and the poor have been terribly hurt during the Covid-19 period, says Gurcharan Das, author, commentator and public intellectual. “A V-shape recovery is an exaggeration. The informal economy and the

Visionary Talk: Gurcharan Das, Author, Commentator & Public Intellectual on key governance issues


Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter