Commissions of Omissions

Who needs these commissions of inquiry anyway?

ajay

Ajay Singh | February 22, 2010



The government's decision to wind up commissions, tribunals and appelate authorities which are not only infructuous but a drain on the exchequer is a welcome move. Justice Balakrishna Eradi has been heading a commission for the past 24 years to resolve river dispute between Punjab and Haryana. Though the commission was not accepted by Punjab, 88-year-old Justice Eradi has been gainfully employed though not doing any work. The tribunal that he is heading under the inter-state water dispute act has not submitted its final report yet. The government is finally making a move to bring curtain down on 40-odd such commissions, tribunals which are headed by retired judges for years on end.

That these quasi-judicial bodies are proving to be unnecessary drain on the exchequre is evident by the fact that Justice Eradi has spent over Rs 9 crore but is yet to discover any dispute resolution mechanism. The same logic can be extended to the dud report filed by the justice liberahn commission on the demolition of the babri mosque on December 6, 1992. Though Liberhan spent over Rs 28 crore, his report was not even worth the papers on which it was written. Despite such an arduous exercise, the culpability for the demolition is still not fixed.

This story is not new. After massacres of thousands of innocent sikhs in Delhi, Bokaro and Kanpur, after assassination of Indira Gandhi, the Rangnath Mishra commission did the same kind of hash job which allowed culrpits to have the last laugh. More recently, two probes instituted by the Gujarat government and the Railway ministry on the Godhra and post-Godhara riots turned to be a mere articulation of their master's voice- either of the then union railway minister Laloo Prasad or the chief minister Narendra Modi. Apparently, these  bodies constituted under the acts of parliament are proving to be tactical instruments to deflect popular pressure and must be dispensed with immediately.

But there is a flip side to the government's initiative too. By introducing an amendement, the government seems to be proposing extension of the retirement age of high court and supreme court judges from 65 to 67 years. This is yet another blatant attempt to appease higher judiciary, particularly the CJI who is due to retire shortly. It would indeed be a travesty of justice if such a step is a trade off to the government's move to wind up futile commissions or tribunals.

 

Comments

 

Other News

Budget: Highlights

Union minister of finance and corporate affairs Nirmala Sitharaman presented the Union Budget 2023-24 in Parliament on Wednesday. The highlights of the Budget are as follows: PART A     Per capita income has more than doubled to Rs 1.97 lakh in around

Budget presents vision for Amrit Kaal: A blueprint for empowered, inclusive economy

Union Budget 2023-24, presented by finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman in the Parliament on Wednesday, outlined the vision of Amrit Kaal which shall reflect an empowered and inclusive economy.  “We envision a prosperous and inclusive India, in which the fruits of development reach all regions an

Soumya Swaminathan to head M S Swaminathan Research Foundation

Former World Health Organisation (WHO) chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan takes charge as chairperson of M S Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) from February 1.   Founded by her father, the legendary agricultural scientist M S Swaminathan, MSSRF was set up to accelerate the use of m

m-Governance: Key to Digital India

The digital revolution is being led by India. Digital governance is a key component of the government's ambition to transform India into a society where everyone has access to the internet. It includes both M-governance and E-governance, which are major methods for the delivery of services via mobile devic

A sacred offering of the beauty of ‘Saundarya Lahari’ – in English

Saundarya Lahari: Wave of Beauty Translated from the Sanskrit by Mani Rao HarperCollins, 218 pages, Rs 399 ‘Saundarya Lahari’, usually ascribed to Adi Shankaracharya, has a unique status among the religious-spiritual works of Hinduism.

The Boy Who Became the Mahatma

This year, as the nation commemorates the 75th death anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi on January 30, Rajesh Talwar, a prolific author who is also a legal advisor to the UN, is all set to release a play for children on non-violence chronicling the life of Mahatma Gandhi, ‘The Boy Who Became the Mahat

Visionary Talk: Amitabh Gupta, Pune Police Commissioner with Kailashnath Adhikari, MD, Governance Now



Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter