MNREGA money down the drain

Make sure it remains an employment programme

brajesh

Brajesh Kumar | February 4, 2011



What was being said in whispers in the corridors of rural development ministry became official on January 21 when the ministry announced that more than 50 percent of works taken up under MNREGA, from the time the Act came into force five years ago, have not been completed. What this means is that year after year workers have been paid for doing temporary works like digging pits, roads, and embankments.

In fact, so worried is the ministry that it has issued a set of instructions to the states to ensure the works taken up by them are completed on time. Even the parliamentary standing committee on rural development has taken a serious view of this.

Explaining the reason behind the significant percentage of unfinished works, Shailendra Tiwari, a member of Sewa Mandir, one of the bigger NGOs working in Rajasthan, says the problem is that of mindset of the workers. “The workers have this entrenched feeling that the since the work is ‘sarkari’, even if they don’t work the money would flow in. They are happy to get as low as Rs 20 a day as it comes without any work,” he says. And he is not off the mark. But that is the reason why systemic safeguards are required.

MNREGA workers digging on the side of the road is a common sight across the country. Sarpanchs deliberately get approval for inconsequential works like expansion of roads, which actually never gets done. Panchayat officials say pucca works like cemented road and water harvesting structures are not put forward for the sanction because they are measurable, unlike earth digging, and therefore the scope for making money gets reduced. There is a cut for every official from the village to district level when kuccha works gets approved.

While the primary objective of the Act is employment guarantee to the rural poor, tangible asset creation is no less important.  However, as records show, the government is channelling huge sum of money (Rs 44,000 crore was earmarked for 2010-11) into a bottomless pit. If this trend is not checked, MNREGA will end up as the largest relief programme.

Comments

 

Other News

Railways’ freight earnings up by 16%

On mission mode, Indian Railways` Freight loading for first ten months of this financial year 2022-23 has crossed last year’s loading and earnings for the same month. On cumulative basis from April 2022 to January 2023, freight loading of 1243.46 MT was achieved against last year&rsquo

BMC announces Rs 52,619.07 crore budget

Mumbai’s municipal commissioner and administrator Iqbal Singh Chahal on Saturday announced a Budget of Rs 52,619.07 crore for 2023-2024, an increase of 20.67% over a revised budget estimate of Rs 43607.10 crore for 2022-23. The overall budget size has doubled in five years. In 2017-18

Making sense of the ‘crisis of political representation’

Imprints of the Populist Time By Ranabir Samaddar Orient BlackSwan, 352 pages, Rs. 1105 The crisis of liberal democracy in the neoliberal world—marked by massive l

Budget: Highlights

Union minister of finance and corporate affairs Nirmala Sitharaman presented the Union Budget 2023-24 in Parliament on Wednesday. The highlights of the Budget are as follows: PART A     Per capita income has more than doubled to Rs 1.97 lakh in around

Budget presents vision for Amrit Kaal: A blueprint for empowered, inclusive economy

Union Budget 2023-24, presented by finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman in the Parliament on Wednesday, outlined the vision of Amrit Kaal which shall reflect an empowered and inclusive economy.  “We envision a prosperous and inclusive India, in which the fruits of development reach all regions an

Soumya Swaminathan to head M S Swaminathan Research Foundation

Former World Health Organisation (WHO) chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan takes charge as chairperson of M S Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF) from February 1.   Founded by her father, the legendary agricultural scientist M S Swaminathan, MSSRF was set up to accelerate the use of m

Visionary Talk: Amitabh Gupta, Pune Police Commissioner with Kailashnath Adhikari, MD, Governance Now



Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter