I don’t want to work with any music company now: Lucky Ali

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Yoshika Sangal | January 10, 2017


#Artists   #Arts   #On a Personal Note   #Music   #Lucky Ali   #Performing Arts  
Lucky Ali
Lucky Ali

Lucky Ali is best known for his husky voice and a distinctive style of music. His debut album, Sunoh, released in 1996, was an instant success and established him in the genre of Indian pop. He has also lent his voice to songs in movies like Bachna Ae Haseeno, Anjaana Anjaani and Tamasha. Son of comedian Mehmood and nephew of actress Meena Kumari, Lucky has also acted in a few films and television series. However, he says that he will now not act in any other movie as movies today have become predictable and lack reality. His only focus now is on cleaning up the environment. Lucky is an avid gardener. He has also tried his hand at breeding horses, selling carpets and even worked on an oil rig. He says he’s an environmentalist with a scientific bent of mind.


What impact has technology made on music and music production?

Progress in technology is benefitting the entire world. Music consists of seven notes. However, people use these notes differently. It depends entirely on individuals, and technology makes that possible.

What is your take on the current music scenario in India?

Music industry, in India, including all deals, is worth Rs 7,000-10,000 crore. But only music corporations make money, not musicians. We are the poor farmers of the music field. The corporation tells us what to make and how to make it. But this kind of a system does not last long as the musician stops feeling the spirit of music. Similar is the issue with copyright. We don’t have the rights to our own music which we make. The corporation keeps the rights. They sell our music and keep the money. I don’t want to work with any music company now, this is my policy. I only do concerts now.

When did you know that your passion is music?

My father [Mehmood] was in the film industry and was associated with people like Rafi sahib [Mohammed Rafi], RD Burman, Kishore Kumar, Hemanta Mukherjee. They used to help each other and they all worked together in the golden period of the 1960s. That is when I realised my passion was in music.

Could you tell us why you call yourself an environ­mentalist?

I am working on a waste management project with a group of friends in which we use waste to make CNG gas. For this we have created and put up a machine in one of the dirtiest places in Bengaluru. I want to put ten-thousand tonne machines in the waste dumps of Mumbai and Delhi. I am within the scientific circles and I am friends with people like Ram Upendra Das [an economist]. My motto is to convert waste to wealth. Last month, I met Uttarakhand CM Harish Rawat who told me about the waste problem in areas like Dehradun, Haridwar and Mussoorie. He has called me to make a presentation on how to tackle the garbage problem. I am an environmentalist in the sense that it is my serious hobby. We should motivate people to plant trees. Cleanliness starts at home; people have to understand its importance. The government is there to give the facilities, but we must take benefit from it.

What are you currently working on?

I am working on a project with Russian and Israeli musicians. It is a concert in which we try to use lights and sounds to create scenery on stage.


 

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