Does content matter when politicians blabber?

pratap

Pratap Vikram Singh | February 8, 2014



The prime ministerial candidate of the BJP and Gujarat's chief minister, Narendra Modi, is considered as a good orator. The saffron leader is known to enthral crowds through his rhetoric. The content of his speeches doesn’t excite me, though. But does content really matter? Perhaps no. That’s what I figured out at a gathering of software and communications professionals and young entrepreneurs who came to hear Modi for his valedictory address at the India Digital Summit on February 7.

For most of the techies I spoke to, Modi is a leader with a vision, a Krishna who will salvage the country. To me his address (to the telecom and IT professionals) was a no show. But then who cares! The theme was digital entrepreneurship and economy, but he didn’t even use those words for a single time. He gave analogies about how important IT and high speed communications networks are for a country’s growth and development.

Here is an analogy. Just try to make sense out of it and let me know if you succeed: “Cities have historically developed around rivers. Later, urban sprawl came around highways. The next generation cities would develop around optical fibre.” Seriously!  To a gathering of software professionals, he appealed to join hands and work towards increasing the domestic manufacturing of electronics.

He also talked about migration, perhaps in the context of the recent death of an Arunachal Pradesh student in Delhi: “Why can’t we give them jobs in the north-east? Why do people have to go to Hyderabad, Pune, Chennai?”

Several professionals I spoke to said Modi’s speech was ‘disappointing’. “He didn’t make sense,” said an entrepreneur, who is with the business development team at Noida-based Solutions Infini, a messaging solutions provider. Modi was “slightly off the mark, but overall absolutely contextual,” said Amit Kopargaonkar of Buzzcity technologies. “Given the options, he would make for a good prime minister.” But several of them said they will vote for him, as “this man at least has a vision”.  

“He is an amazing orator. He just makes you forget everything. He has a vision. Now whether he delivers is another question,” said Vaishali Neotia, founder and CEO, MERXIUS, a Hyderabad-based company which makes augmented reality applications.

For the 24-year-old Nishit Mamgain, who works as marketing officer with Letsgoma Labs, which is into mobile applications business, Modi knows the art of connecting with the people. Another IT professional, who didn’t wish to be named, said Modi disappointed in most of his speech. But he admires Modi as a leader, and keeps him on a high pedestal vis-a-vis Rahul Gandhi and Manmohan Singh or any other political leader. Modi has his vote, too!

Comments

 

Other News

Can the JD(S)-Congress combine give stable government in Karnataka?

Can the JD(S)-Congress combine give stable government in Karnataka?

Making palliative care child’s play

Sneha Sena is a unique attempt to integrate education and healthcare by bringing school children into the field of palliative care. In Kerala’s Alappuzha district, a government medical officer has decided to create an army of student volunteers to be part of the government’s pain

An African salient

To counter Beijing’s aggressive agenda in the Indian Ocean, New Delhi is seeking to create strategic bastions in Mauritius, Seychelles and Madagascar. The immediate provocation was China’s inauguration of its first overseas military base in Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa.

Look who’s talking ethics in Karnataka?

 Just after the UP assembly election in 1996, I was among the scores of reporters waiting at Kalyan Singh’s residence, waiting to get the first inkling of the future course of the BJP. The party had secured the maximum seats – 174 out of 425 seats – but was short of the majority mark

Company secretaries are gatekeepers of corporate governance: SEBI Chairman

“Company Secretaries, once known as secretaries to the board and management, have transformed themselves into key managerial and governance professionals. Today they are recognised for their importance on corporate landscape and have become gatekeepers of corporate governance,” said Ajay Tyagi,

Will there be light at the end of the tunnel?

Any good news which promises to bring about qualitative improvement in the lives of people, especially in rural India, is always welcome. It was heartening indeed to learn that every single village in the country now has access to electricity, as announced by the prime minister on April 29. This is most ce

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter