Break in monsoon may help Kashmir regain its bearings

Jhelum river in spate but weather conditions have improved

GN Bureau | June 25, 2015


#jammu and Kashmir   #monsoon   #flood  

Jhelum is again in spate but may not cause much havoc like last year in Jammu and Kashmir as rainfall may ebb in next 48 hours.

The state government issued a flood warning after the Jhelum river crossed the danger mark at various places, inundating low-lying areas of South and Central Kashmir, sending people living on the banks of the river into panic.

However, the incessant rains since Wednesday morning may reduce thus easing the situation by Thursday evening. The severe weather conditions have started to weaken.

Several parts of south Kashmir were inundated today with streams and rivulets running in spate and the Jhelum flowing above the danger mark as heavy rainfall lashed the region.

Jhelum was flowing above the danger mark at Sangam in Anantnag district at 27.10 feet at 10.30 am and level at Ram Munshi bagh in Srinagar city was 20.30 feet, which is also above the danger mark.

In south Kashmir, road leading to the tourist resort of Pahalgam from Bijbehara town was blocked by angry protesters at Katsoo demanding immediate attention of administration in inundated areas.

The 300 km long strategic Srinagar-Jammu highway was submerged at Charsoo Awantipora village in Pulwama district of the valley.

A flood alert was sounded late last night for Anantnag and Pulwama districts with the MeT department predicting more rain over the next 48 hours.

Several areas of Anantnag district, including Nai Basti, Takia Behrampora, Shamsipora and Hassanpora, were flooded due to the overflowing Jhelum river and its tributaries.

Some parts of Kulgam district, including Qoimoh, Mir Bazar, Asthal and Devsar, were also inundated as the Vaishav stream breached its banks.

The water level in the Jhelum and its tributaries rose sharply following heavy rainfall since yesterday.

Jhelum was flowing at 27.15-ft, 4.15-ft above the danger mark, at Sangam at noon, they said. In Srinagar, the summer capital of Jammu and Kashmir, the river had risen to 20.70-ft, almost two feet above the danger mark.

Several bridges and roads have been washed away in south Kashmir with the Tral area in Pulwama district bearing the brunt of flash floods triggered by the downpour.

Minor breaches have been reported in embankments of water bodies at some places, but officials of Flood Control department have plugged these, the officials said.

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