See documentary on gangrape, BBC producer urges Modi

BBC shows documentary on December 16 rape case in the UK and will abide by the ban in India

GN Bureau | March 5, 2015


#bbc   #rape victim   #india   #india’s daughter   #leslee udwin  


The BBC, while declaring that it has no plans to telecast the controversial documentary on December 16, 2012 gangrape incident in India, it went ahead and broadcast it in the UK. Earlier, the documentary was scheduled for March 8, coinciding with International Women’s Day, but suddenly the British media company decided to advance it to Wednesday night.

It said the film had handled the issue “responsibly”.  “This harrowing documentary, made with the full support and cooperation of the victim’s parents, provides a revealing insight into a horrific crime that sent shock waves around the world and led to protests across India demanding changes in attitudes towards women,” the BBC said.


 “The film handles the issue responsibly and we are confident the programme fully complies with our editorial guidelines. The documentary has the backing of a number of other public service broadcasters, however the BBC is only responsible for transmission of the film in the UK,” the broadcaster said.

The BBC broadcast was on in the UK on a day the Indian Parliament witnessed outrage over the interview of gangrape convict.  “Under no circumstances, this documentary will be allowed to be broadcast… Government has taken necessary action and secured an order restraining the telecast of the film,” Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh told Parliament.


The documentary included an interview conducted by British filmmaker Leslee Udwin and BBC, of Mukesh Singh, the driver of the bus in which the 23-year-old paramedical student was brutally gangraped by six men on December 16, 2012. Mukesh has made derogatory statements against women, Delhi police said.

A Delhi court has restrained media from publishing, broadcasting, telecasting or uploading the interview on the internet.

On her part, Udwin appealed to Prime Minister Narendra Modi to view the documentary, which, she said, was a “gift to India”, before any action was taken on it.

She said India has shown the lead globally in the wake of the horrific crime which had led to protests across the country. Rape was an issue of global concern which she has highlighted in the documentary, she said.

Meanwhile, speaking to media, the rape victim’s father said “I heard what the rapist Mukesh Singh said in the documentary. He thinks that my daughter asked to be raped. It made me feel sad, but not angry. It disturbs me when people like him say it was the girl's fault that she was raped. But I have stopped getting angry now because many men, even from good families and with good degrees, seem to think like this. How can our daughters study and work freely if society thinks like this?”

“It is worse when politicians sitting in Parliament say the girl could have prevented rape. How can they make such irresponsible statements? Don't they understand that what they say will be heard by hundreds of people? I think these men have no respect for women, which automatically means they have no respect for their parents. Their thinking is sick. Also, Mukesh is challenging society and the judicial system,” he told a newspaper.
 

 

 

 

Comments

 

Other News

An African salient

To counter Beijing’s aggressive agenda in the Indian Ocean, New Delhi is seeking to create strategic bastions in Mauritius, Seychelles and Madagascar. The immediate provocation was China’s inauguration of its first overseas military base in Djibouti, in the Horn of Africa.

Look who’s talking ethics in Karnataka?

 Just after the UP assembly election in 1996, I was among the scores of reporters waiting at Kalyan Singh’s residence, waiting to get the first inkling of the future course of the BJP. The party had secured the maximum seats – 174 out of 425 seats – but was short of the majority mark

Company secretaries are gatekeepers of corporate governance: SEBI Chairman

“Company Secretaries, once known as secretaries to the board and management, have transformed themselves into key managerial and governance professionals. Today they are recognised for their importance on corporate landscape and have become gatekeepers of corporate governance,” said Ajay Tyagi,

Will there be light at the end of the tunnel?

Any good news which promises to bring about qualitative improvement in the lives of people, especially in rural India, is always welcome. It was heartening indeed to learn that every single village in the country now has access to electricity, as announced by the prime minister on April 29. This is most ce

A dry run in Bundelkhand

The paved road, the few concrete houses and men on motorcycles – these are deceptive signs of development in Madralalpur village. Only a couple of weeks ago, Babu, a 47-year-old distressed farmer, had hanged himself from a babool tree. Villagers were gathered at his house as his wife, mother, sister-

Our jobs, their jobs

Statistics has come a long way from the time when British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli observed: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” Statistics is now an accredited branch of applied mathematics; statistical methods are routinely used to prove or disprove the

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter