Are we letting the courts too far into our homes?

GN Bureau | February 16, 2012



Recently, there has been a spate of court pronouncements on issues that have a bearing on how most Indian families are structured and function. Some of these judgments can be viewed as progressive given the context of the urbane. For example, live-in partners as well as married folk will have equal rights over property acquired after moving in or marriage. Another grants the rights of tenancy to parents and a child has to have his/her parents' consent to stay at any ancestral/parental property.

At the same time, we can't have a one-size-fits-all appproach, especially in a country like ours where the definitions and practices of familial and scoial life are diverse. These court judgments need contexts to determine their appropriateness.

In the light of these consideratioins and the others that you may have, do you think that we are letting the courts too far into our homes? Post your thoughts on the issue. And yes, don't forget to vote!

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