Is rewarding Maoists for surrender the right strategy?

GN Bureau | February 23, 2012



The government wants to wean cadres away from the maoists with cash lures. Arms surrender will get them anything between Rs 3-5 lakh. According to a report in The Telegraph, the reward a surrendering personnel of the banned outfit carries on his/her head will got to him/her.

Now, the surrender-cum-rehabilitation policies of states have always carried cash rewards — in Jharkhand a surrendering maoist can get anything between Rs 30,000 to Rs 12 lakh depending on his/her rank in the outfit. However, the latest hike is likely to be adopted by all states.

This begs the question if cash rewards are the right way to go to erode the maoists' ranks. The rebels draw both support and cadres from areas reeling under decades of neglect and underdevelopment. State apathy and atrocities fuel anger and support for the rebels. Spending on governance in these areas is worse than a pittance. So, shouldn't the state, instead of trying to buy the maoists into its fold, focus on spending on improving the lives of the people who are compelled to rebel? After all, with the new cash-for surrender policy, the government is buying back its own guns — most of the maoist arsenal is weapons looted from police stations.

The government needs to step on the gas with a development offensive to check the spread of the maoist ideology. The solution lies in disincentivising joining the outfit, not in offering incentives to quit. Of course, one may argue that only when the swelling ranks are checked can a development strategy be mounted. But, it has to be also appreciated that this way the state is prodding one to pick up a gun only to surrender it later for money.

Quite the chicken-and-egg problem this, but what is your view? Do you think we should pay maoists to lay down guns or prevent sympathisers from taking up one in time? Post your thoughts.

Comments

 

Other News

The dirt in the diamond trade

The dazzling diamond trade has been hit hard by the Nirav Modi episode, which saw the billionaire jeweller flee India just before a massive fraud amounting to Rs 11,000 crore was detected at a Punjab National Bank branch in Mumbai. But, Nirav Modi is not the only diamond tycoon who has been

PM lays foundation stone for Navi Mumbai International Airport

PM Narendra Modi on Sunday laid the foundation stone for Rs 16,700 crore Navi Mumbai International Airport. The first phase of the construction is expected to be completed by December 2019. The project is going to be implemented 21 years after it was first proposed. The airport is likely to handle 10 milli

Health groups irked by the SC order on vaccine PSUs

Health groups have expressed their disappointment with a February 12 order of the supreme court, refusing to review or recall an earlier order disposing off a case against the mala fide suspension of the vaccine public sector units (PSUs) and government’s tendency to pamper private sector with public

Cut government stake below 50% in banks: Assocham

The Punjab National Bank`s fraudulent transactions worth Rs 11,300 crore should act as a strong trigger for the government for reducing its stake to less than 50 percent in the banks which should then be allowed to work on the lines of private sector lenders with a full sense of accountability to their sha

Tightrope walking meets poll dance

Budget 2018, forecast to be a “please all” budget, has come out as a “disappoint all” budget. The public is looking askance at a budget that gives with one hand but takes away with both, the Sensex has gone into a tailspin and the pink papers are issuing dire warnings.

Should public sector banks be privatised?

Should public sector banks be privatised?

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter