It’s traumatic, says African student

India will lose connect with Africa due to attack on African students in Greater Noida

rahul

Rahul Dass | March 28, 2017 | New Delhi


#Sushma Swaraj   #Noida   #protest   #racism   #African students   #Association of African Students  


 
“We have requested more security from the government of India and the Uttar Pradesh government,” said Abdou Ibrahim, senior adviser, Association of African Students (AASI)  following an attack on four students from Africa in Greater Noida, Uttar Pradesh.
 
Ibrahim told Governance Now that it was “a traumatic situation”. “We have asked African students in Greater Noida to stay inside their homes and not venture out.”
 
He added that the students from Africa will “finish their studies, but never return to India”.
 
At least four Africans were beaten up in Greater Noida’s Pari Chowk area during a candlelight march for a 17-year-old boy who died on Saturday evening. According to police, the Class XII student had allegedly died of a drug overdose, following which his family accused their five Nigerian neighbours of murder and demanded their arrest, reported Indian Express 
 
Ibrahim assessed that “India will lose connect with Africa. The continuity will be lost”.
He said that boy who five African students were accused of kidnapping had come back home. “The accusations were absolutely false. They have been wrongly accused of selling drugs,” he said.
 
This is not the first time that Africans have been attacked in India.
 
In May 2016, over a dozen African nationals were attacked in Rajpkhurd village of Chhatarpur, South Delhi. Locals objected to the “free lifestyle” of these men and women who stayed in the area.
 
In February 2016, a mob attacked the 21-year-old woman as she drove with friends in Bengaluru, beating her, tearing off her shirt and setting the car ablaze. The attack was an apparent revenge for a fatal road accident in which a Sudanese man had allegedly run over a woman less than an hour before.
 
Somnath Bharti, a former law minister of Delhi, Bharti was accused in 2014 of harassing African women after he led a vigilante mob that accused them of being prostitutes.
 
In 2013, a Nigerian national was killed by a mob in Goa. State minister Dayanand Mandrekar called Nigerians a “cancer”.
 

Comments

 

Other News

Mumbai hospitals shut as more and more healthcare workers test positive

Maharashtra has emerged the epicentre of the Novel Coronavirus outbreak in the country with Mumbai reporting the highest number of cases in the state. With more and more healthcare providers getting infected, hospitals are becoming the hotbeds of virus perpetuation. On Monday Wockhardt hosp

As nation lighted lamps, power grid delivered

As Indians switched off lights in homes and lighted lamps and candles Sunday night following prime minister Narendra Modi’s appeal as a gesture of solidarity in the fight against COVID-19, the power grid held up well despite the sudden drop in demand. In a short video message on Friday

3 out of 4 Covid-19 patients in 21-60 yrs age group

Contrary to the perception that the elderly are more at risk from Covid-19, in India as many as 41.88% of corona positive cases are between 21 to 40 years of age. Also, 32.82% positive cases are between 41 to 60 years, followed by 16.69% cases above the age of 60 years and 8.61% coronavirus positive cases

Why everyone should wear mask

In view of the increasing number of COVID -19 cases in the country, the ministry of health and family welfare (MoHFW) has now advised that everyone must voluntarily wear a mask and especially those living in densely populated areas.   Not just as a matter of maintaining personal hygiene

Fighting Covid-19, India has realized its collective strength: PM

In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic, people of India have realized their collective strength, prime minister Narendra Modi said in a short video message Friday morning. He also urged people to light lamps Sunday night as a gesture of this collectivity. “Today marks nine days of the na

COVID-19 demobilisation: Lessons for public governance

Demobilization, like its predecessor – demonetization, is another decision gone bad in implementation.  In both instances a careful public administrative action through its governance systems could have saved the magnitude of impact particularly on the most vulnerable sections of the society. Th



Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter