ADR to launch a campaign for clean politics

Students will be mobilised to understand that a taint-free parliament and state assemblies as well as transparency of political parties are the preconditions for good governance

GN Bureau | March 3, 2017


#Good Governance   #Political Funding   #ADR   #Association for Democratic Reforms   #Democracy   #Schools   #Youth  
Representational image
Representational image

The Association for Democratic Reforms (ADR) which has been working towards increasing transparency and accountability in political and electoral system is taking forward its advocacy to another level. It has planned to launch a Hum Badlenge Apna Bharat campaign for school and college students –future voters of the country.

Through this campaign, the ADR plans to mobilise youth to get involved in pressurising politicians to deliver good governance and help strengthening democracy. It will organise workshops across the country to educate school and college students about informed voting and good governance and transparency. Under this campaign, workshops will be held in 50 schools, with a minimum budget of at least Rs 25,000 per school. Click here to donate to the ADR.

ADR’s continuous efforts, through analysis and dissemination of information about criminal, financial and other background details of candidates contesting elections as well as analysis of political parties’ finances, legal advocacy and grass-root level awareness programmes, has sensitised certain sections towards the issue of political and electoral reforms. The constant pressure from judiciary, ECI, Central Information Commission (CIC), Law Commission, CSOs like ADR, press and other organisations has nudged the present government to at least start talking of the need to reform the political party funding. The political parties however, have taken a rigid stance in not complying with the CIC’s June 3, 2013 order of bringing them under the ambit of the RTI Act. Government's recent measures to reduce the cash donations and introduction of electoral bonds in political funding do not enhance transparency. By not implementing the recommendations of Law Commission’s 255th Report, it is obvious that the political class lacks the will to bring out electoral reforms.
 

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