Maldives crisis explained

India can either wait and watch or try to put boots on the ground

GN Bureau | February 7, 2018


#Abdulla Yameen   #Maldives   #Maldives Crisis   #Mohamed Nasheed  
Former Maldivian president Mohamed Nasheed
Former Maldivian president Mohamed Nasheed

India is closely monitoring the situation in Maldives which has been plunged into turmoil since February 1.

So, what happened?

President Abdulla Yameen has declared a state of emergency in Maldives, an Indian Ocean archipelago which is a big draw for tourists.

Why did he do so?

The apex court of Maldives overturned terrorism convictions against nine leaders opposed to Yameen. The court ordered those in jail to be freed. Yameen defied the ruling and refused to comply with requests from foreign countries.

On Tuesday, in a televised address, the president said he has declared a state of emergency to investigate what he described as a "coup" against him.

Then, what happened?

Former president Mohamed Nasheed, in a tweet on February 5, sought help from India.

What did Nasheed want?

“1. India to send envoy, backed by its military, to release judges & pol. detainees inc. Prez. Gayoom. We request a physical presence. 2. The US to stop all financial transactions of Maldives regime leaders going through US banks.”

What was India’s reaction?

A day after Nasheed’s plea, India said it was “disturbed” by the emergency imposed in Maldives.

A statement issued by the ministry of external affairs said HYPERLINK http://www.mea.gov.in/press-releases.htm?dtl/29415/Situation+in+Maldives: “We are disturbed by the declaration of a State of Emergency in the Maldives following the refusal of the Government to abide by the unanimous ruling of the full bench of the Supreme Court on 1 February, and also by the suspension of Constitutional rights of the people of Maldives. The arrest of the Supreme Court Chief Justice and political figures are also reasons for concern.”

What options does New Delhi have?

It can wait and watch or try to put boots on the ground.

Has India intervened in Maldives in the past?

Yes. In 1988 there was an attempt by a group of Maldivians led by Abdullah Luthufi and assisted by armed mercenaries of a Tamil secessionist organisation from Sri Lanka, the People's Liberation Organisation of Tamil Eelam (PLOTE), to overthrow the government in Maldives. The coup  failed due to the intervention of the Indian Army, whose military operations efforts were code-named Operation Cactus.

Comments

 

Other News

Why is Lanka in flames: the making of a crisis

This time it was not Lord Hanuman, but the poor decision-making of the political leaders combined with several global economic factors that set Sri Lanka in flames. A state of emergency was declared in Sri Lanka. This month, after the Prime Minister of Sri Lanka resigned from his post, the

Growing Up as a Multilinguist

Being and Becoming Multilingual: Some Narratives Edited by Rajesh Sachdeva and Rama Kant Agnihotri

Mumbai civil body refutes allegations of scam in tenement scheme

The BrihanMumbai municipal corporation (BMC) has rejected the Congress accusations of financial irregularities worth Rs 8,000 crore—9,000 croe in awarding contracts for getting project-affected people (PAP) tenements on private land.    BMC has said that it implements vital p

Sedition law: Can it have a place in democracy?

Does the concept of sedition have a place in modern democracies? This question became more relevant when the apex court recently put the country`s colonial-era sedition law on abeyance stating that there is a “requirement to balance… security interests and integrity of the State… and th

Not just another Manto anthology

The Collected Stories of Saadat Hasan Manto: Volume 1: Bombay and Poona Translated by Nasreen Rehman Aleph Book Company, 548 pages, Rs 999 There are writers, there are writers’ writers, and then there are readers’ writers. Saadat Hasan Mant

These tribal women may be illiterate but are successful entrepreneurs

Meet Promila Krishna, 39, Lalita Nayak, 40, Parbati Gadba, 42, Sanadei Dhuruwa, 39, and Nabita Barika, 41, of Kundra block in Odisha’s Koraput district. Except for Promila who is a matriculate, others haven’t attended school beyond the elementary level. However, while introducing themselves to

Visionary Talk: Arvind Sawant, Member of Parliament with Kailashnath Adhikari, MD, Governance Now


Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter