Politics of adamant and the arrogant

Language, attitude and Elders conduct

prahlad

Prahlad Rao | December 18, 2014 | New Delhi



Adjectives were flying high inside the seat of power and with plenty of import and meanings. The parliament on Thursday witnessed an intelligent play of words and politics of different opinions. While the opposition parties thought the government was adamant on not letting Prime Minister Narendra Modi make a statement on conversion issue, the government called the opposition arrogant for holding the session for ransom.

Curiously, the political parties seem to take these adamant and arrogant positions too often, especially when they cannot get their way in or out.

When Amit Shah’s rally in Kolkata snowballed into a controversy the words adamant and arrogant were used by both the BJP and the ruling TMC in Bengal.

Last year when the AAP in Delhi insisted on the suspension of Delhi Police officials involved in an incident with their party leader, the Aam Aadmi Party was branded as adamant and the government obviously was arrogant.

Even in the US, when the administration and the Republicans were wrestling for funds to spending cut logjam, the air was thick with arrogant and adamant attitudes.

Hollywood’s famous director Oliver Stone has been quoted as saying that “in politics, the right wing, outspoken, adamant, hardcore gets far more attention than those who bring ambiguity and a softer approach.”

However, the Art of War book describes adamant attitude in a most positive manner. It says: Use your credibility as leverage for your projects. Go into every situation with an open mind. Avoid being easily predictable. Then the opposition cannot spread rumours against you. Even the most adamant opponent cannot counter you.

And arrogant is one emotion that always gets pushed to the negative side. America’s well-know journalist Sydney Harris said once, “nobody can be so amusingly arrogant as a young man who has just discovered an old idea and thinks it is his own.”

But then, a situation can be rescued and restored with dignity if one reflects on what the great Austrian-American actor Theodore Bikel proclaimed. “All too often arrogance accompanies strength, and we must never assume that justice is on the side of the strong. The use of power must always be accompanied by moral choice,” Bikel once said.
 
 

 

Comments

 

Other News

Government divests 12% stakes in RITES; IPO opens on June 20

The railway infrastructure consulting PSU, RITES Limited is coming up with its IPO on June 20, 2018, as the government of India is selling its 24 million equity shares (12%) stake in the Mini Ratna PSU. As an initial public offering 25,200,000 equity shares are offered in which employee reservation portion

“This initiative is for future generations”

Speaking to Governance Now, Gujarat chief minister Vijay Rupani elaborates on the Sujalam Sufalam scheme to rejuvenate talavdis and desilt reservoirs and lakes. He also speaks on water, politics, and cons

Water by the pondful

It’s 10 am and in Dhandhuka town of Ahmedabad district, the sun is already scorching. A dry lake, which was desilted and deepened a few weeks back, has been turned into a venue for a fete. Shamianas have been erected, women in bright sarees and men and children in their best clothes flock the venue,

Thugs of Hindustan

This story may sound apocryphal but it was recounted by LK Advani in one of his casual conversations. Talking about Morarji Desai, he said that despite his idiosyncrasies, he was a man of impeccable integrity. To buttress his point Advani recalled this incident: After the Janata Party formed the government

IRCTC listing still lingering despite clearance in 2017

Ministry of railways’ decision of holding the listing of Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC) has exposed its seriousness in listing its public enterprises in stock exchanges. Although the decision was taken one year back, the national transporter does not have a com

Delhi crisis shows failure of governance, says ex Delhi chief secy

The tussle between the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) and lieutenant governor of Delhi Anil Baijal has entered into its fourth day on Thursday. With no immediate solution to the ongoing ego-tussle, citizens are the mute sufferers.  Umesh Sehgal, former chief secretary of Delhi, feels that instead of

Current Issue

Current Issue

Video

CM Nitish’s convoy attacked in Buxar

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter