India needs a forward looking foreign policy: C Raja Mohan

The leading policy expert suggested ways for India to adapt to shape its foreign policy

taru

Taru Bhatia | April 14, 2016


#C Raja Mohan   #India   #foreign policy  


“We have never been so connected to the world. The scale of India’s external engagement today has become quite dramatic. And so, dealing with it is going to be a challenge. This cannot be done through traditional foreign policy,” C Raja Mohan, director of think tank Carnegie India, said while delivering a lecture on ‘India in a changing Asia: towards a forward policy’ in Delhi on April 13.

India today is the seventh largest economy in the world with its GDP at $2.2 trillion. Around 50 percent of this comes from the export and import of goods and services. However, “much of the discourse continues to be that we are weak”, Mohan said.

He added that India being an important member to Asia, it is now time for it to look into a forward looking policy, which would shape the future of the region.
Suggesting different ways that India could adapt for shaping its foreign policy, Mohan said one would be by accepting the “China-centered growth” for the Asian region. He, however, added that for America, it would be a big problem to accept.

Another way, he highlighted, is by exploring the accommodation for China and the United States, the two big powers of the world, by a way of “G2”. For this, “China says yes to it but on its own terms which is not acceptable to the Americans”.

Mohan stressed that India needs to look forward to a multi-structured balancing power policy in which three or four big powers of the region come together and set the rules. “But the problem with Asia is that there are too many big countries. Who is going be in the group is a real challenge to decide,” he said.
Hence, India could take a middle power coalition policy, forming a coalition with Japan and Australia, and not putting Asia’s destiny in the hands of the Chinese, he suggested. That way, India would have a “coalition of its own”, instead of waiting for the Chinese to define a way forward.

Another foreign policy India could think of is “collective security”, which Mohan termed as the “most beautiful of all solutions in which everybody can sit together and work out rules”.
 

Comments

 

Other News

How inequality keeps rising amid pandemic – and is killing people

The world’s ten richest men more than doubled their fortunes from $700 billion to $1.5 trillion (at a rate of $15,000 per second or $1.3 billion a day) during the first two years of a pandemic while the incomes of 99 percent of humanity fall and over 160 million more people forced into poverty. A new

Vistadome coaches on Central Railways a hit with passengers

The Vistadome coaches on Central Railways have received an overwhelming response from passengers. Not only have they boosted tourism and registered an occupancy of 20,407 passengers but also clocked revenue of Rs.2.38 crore between October and December 2021.   The CSMT-Madgaon-CSMT Jansh

Omicron on relentless run: India records 2.68 lakh cases

India is once again caught in a spike of Covid-19 cases, with the highly transmittable omicron driving numbers. The total cases in the country continued to increase on Saturday, recording 2.68 lakh cases in 24 hours. India`s active caseload currently stands at 14,17,820 or 3.85%, while the r

Bill Gates, charity and the dilemma of already successful people

Mantra and the meaning of Success By Rajesh Talwar Bridging Borders, 288 pages Rajesh Talwar, who works as Deputy Legal Adviser to the United Nations Mission in Afghanistan, has written 31 books, and on January 15 he is releasing one more. ‘

An inquisitive reader’s guide to Ramayana, Mahabharata and the Puranas

Essence of the Fifth Veda By Gaurang Damani Divine Destination, 234 pages, Rs 350 ‘Veda’ literally means ‘knowledge’.

Humility: Going beyond binaries to deliver justice to tribals

Being Adivasi: Existence, Entitlements, Exclusion [Part of ‘Rethinking India’ series] Edited by Abhay Flavian Xaxa and G.N. Devy Penguin, xxvi+182 pages, Rs 699 ‘Being Adivasi: Existence, Entitlements, Exclusion’ (Penguin India), edited by

Visionary Talk: Farmer`s Agitation, Rakesh Tikait with Kailashnath Adhikari


Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter