In conversation with Kavita Krishnamurty

yoshika

Yoshika Sangal | January 20, 2016




Kavita Krishnamurty Subramaniam is a renowned playback singer credited for singing some of the very popular Bollywood songs. Born in Delhi in a Tamil Iyer family, Kavita began her vocal training under Sri Balram Puri (in the Hindustani music) at a very young age. She began her recording career in 1971. At a very young age, she got the opportunity to record a song with Lata Mangeshkar and music composer Hemant Kumar. Since then, she has given voice to several actresses and worked with many music composers including RD Burman and AR Rehman. She has won four Filmfare awards in the best female playback singer category, including three consecutive times from 1994 to 1996. She also received the Padma Shri in 2005. Kavita is married to violinist L Subramaniam.

 
Thing that brought me closer to music: Being a south Indian and having a Bengali upbringing, I think it was in my genes

Happiness to me is: Being around my family members

My favourite song: Pyaar hua chupke se from the movie, 1942: A Love Story, for which I got my first Filmfare award

My low point in life: The day my father passed away, when I was just 21-year-old. He was my icon and I think after that the world ended for me for some time

My favourite pastime: Spending time with my four-year-old granddaughter. I love reading stories to her

The person who inspired me: Protima Bhattacharya, my Bengali aunt who brought me up. She was the one who dreamt of me being a singer and who brought me to Mumbai.

If not a singer: I would be a veterinarian. I love animals, especially dogs. I can spend a whole day with animals without missing human beings

I take care of my health by: Taking a lot of medicines for my bronchitis

My greatest achievement: When I received my Padma Shri from president Abdul Kalam

My idea of comfort food: Bengali kheer made with Bengali gud. All my problems are solved with it

My dream: To travel to rare places like Iceland and Alaska. I’m hoping to go closest to the northern point of the world

Singing reality shows are: Fantastic. The senior generation of our country love sitting at home and listening to youngsters singing. It is
generating a lot of employment as a lot of these children are coming from poor families and this is an excellent platform for them to showcase their talent

My advice to aspiring singers: Never lose hope

I want to be remembered as: Honestly, it would be very egoistic for me to say that I want to be remembered. Apart of being a singer I just want to be a good wife, good mother and a good person

My life mantra: As a musician you should never relax. Your ears and the windows of your mind should always be open

As told to Yoshika Sangal

(The interview appears in the January 1-15, 2016 issue)
 

Comments

 

Other News

How inequality keeps rising amid pandemic – and is killing people

The world’s ten richest men more than doubled their fortunes from $700 billion to $1.5 trillion (at a rate of $15,000 per second or $1.3 billion a day) during the first two years of a pandemic while the incomes of 99 percent of humanity fall and over 160 million more people forced into poverty. A new

Vistadome coaches on Central Railways a hit with passengers

The Vistadome coaches on Central Railways have received an overwhelming response from passengers. Not only have they boosted tourism and registered an occupancy of 20,407 passengers but also clocked revenue of Rs.2.38 crore between October and December 2021.   The CSMT-Madgaon-CSMT Jansh

Omicron on relentless run: India records 2.68 lakh cases

India is once again caught in a spike of Covid-19 cases, with the highly transmittable omicron driving numbers. The total cases in the country continued to increase on Saturday, recording 2.68 lakh cases in 24 hours. India`s active caseload currently stands at 14,17,820 or 3.85%, while the r

Bill Gates, charity and the dilemma of already successful people

Mantra and the meaning of Success By Rajesh Talwar Bridging Borders, 288 pages Rajesh Talwar, who works as Deputy Legal Adviser to the United Nations Mission in Afghanistan, has written 31 books, and on January 15 he is releasing one more. ‘

An inquisitive reader’s guide to Ramayana, Mahabharata and the Puranas

Essence of the Fifth Veda By Gaurang Damani Divine Destination, 234 pages, Rs 350 ‘Veda’ literally means ‘knowledge’.

Humility: Going beyond binaries to deliver justice to tribals

Being Adivasi: Existence, Entitlements, Exclusion [Part of ‘Rethinking India’ series] Edited by Abhay Flavian Xaxa and G.N. Devy Penguin, xxvi+182 pages, Rs 699 ‘Being Adivasi: Existence, Entitlements, Exclusion’ (Penguin India), edited by

Visionary Talk: Farmer`s Agitation, Rakesh Tikait with Kailashnath Adhikari


Archives

Current Issue

Opinion

Facebook    Twitter    Google Plus    Linkedin    Subscribe Newsletter

Twitter